Explore The NRA Universe Of Websites

APPEARS IN First Things First
Thursday, October 1, 2015

Sheriffs Challenge Colorado Gun Bans Before Federal Appeals Court Panel

Dozens of current and former Colorado sheriffs gathered in Denver on Monday as a three-judge panel of the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals heard oral arguments challenging two Colorado laws—one banning ammunition magazines with capacities over 15 rounds, and another requiring background checks for all firearm “transfers,” even temporary loans—that the sheriffs said were unenforceable and unconstitutional. 

Monday’s federal appeals court hearing on Colorado Outfitters v. Hickenlooper is the latest chapter in a dispute that began when 54 Colorado sheriffs filed a civil suit challenging the laws (Gov. Hickenlooper, who signed the laws despite the sheriffs’ opposition, later issued what he called a “half-assed apology” for doing so), and was further complicated by a federal judge dismissing the sheriffs’ case in 2014. 

The panel that heard the case on Monday was composed of two judges appointed by President Obama and one appointed by President George W. Bush. Stay tuned …


Seven Deadly Hours In Chicago

In just seven hours Monday night, gang violence left five Chicagoans shot dead and a dozen more wounded. Horrifically, an 11-month-old child was wounded, his mother and grandmother killed. Police said they were innocent victims of a gang turf war.

U.S. Attorney Zach Fardon had just revealed that Chicago gang murders are up 20 percent over last year. Mayor Rahm Emmanuel again directed the blame toward guns: “It’s time that our criminal justice system and the laws as it relates to access to guns and the laws for using them reflect the values of the people of the city of Chicago.”

But while Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy agreed, he also revealed the root of the problem: “We have to hold criminals responsible … it’s the same pattern over and over again. Until such time that they are held accountable, we could make a billion gun arrests a year, and it’s not going to make a difference.”


Retired Sheriff Sues NY County Over Gun Permit Denial

Victor Patalano served as a deputy sheriff in Nassau County, N.Y., for more than 25 years. In 2010, while serving a summons, he slipped on ice and ended up having a hip replaced. Now retired, Patalano wants to protect his family the best way he knows how—with a firearm. But the former deputy has been denied that right. 

He’s not alone. Three retired Nassau County correction officers have also been denied their right to a firearm due to physical disabilities. Now they’ve filed suit against the county in hopes of changing that. 

“This suit is necessary to change how disabled officers, who served this county well, are being treated by the county when they want the same benefits that other retirees get,” said Frederick Brewington, the Hempstead attorney representing Patalano, Thomas Delle, Alexandros Perros and Nicholas Lenoci. Here’s hoping justice is swiftly served.


BB Guns Not Just Child’s Play In Minnesota

In 2005, David Haywood of Minnesota received a felony drug conviction, and thereby forfeited his Second Amendment rights. During a 2013 traffic stop, police found a firearm in his glove compartment, and Haywood was sent back to prison on a minimum five-year sentence. On Monday, an appellate court upheld the conviction.

What makes this case unusual is that the “firearm” in question was a Walther CP99 Compact BB gun. 

Haywood’s attorneys claimed that, as BB guns do not utilize gunpowder, they shouldn’t be subject to the same rules governing possession by felons. Minnesota statue offered little help—it refers to “firearms” but has never defined them. So the court had only a 1977 state Supreme Court decision, which defined BB guns as firearms using wording from state fish and game laws, as precedent—meaning BB guns are firearms in Minnesota until either the legislature adopts new language or the state Supreme Court changes the definition.


Texas School Asks Invasive Questions About Guns In Homes

Students in a journalism class at Hendrickson High School in Pflugerville, Texas, were given a survey requesting information on their parents’ political views and whether they keep firearms in the home. The questions addressed the number of guns in the household as well as their purpose. 

Local gun store owner and gun-rights activist Michael Cargill broke the news, noting that the topic of guns “… is a great conversation for kids to have in the classroom … but the questions that concern me are the ones that ask …” about number of guns and political affiliation. “That’s private,” he concluded. 

Some parents had harsher words. “Doesn’t matter if it’s a journalistic survey, it crosses the line,” said one. “This wouldn’t be answered in my home, and this is the reason that any poll similar to it is not accurate.”


Armed Vet Stops In-Law’s Burglary

When Army veteran and National Guardsman John Scott of Covert Township, Mich., received a call from his mother–in-law that his brother-in-law’s house had already been burglarized twice that day, Scott knew just what to do. That’s why he was waiting in the living room, .45 pistol in hand, when the thief showed up to haul off even more belongings.

When Scott pointed his gun at the thief and ordered him to stop, the man ran for the nearby woods. Undeterred, Scott chased him down and, with the help of a neighbor, tied the burglar up and held him until authorities arrived and took over.

Police continue to search for two more suspects involved in the break-ins. Scott suffered minor scratches, bruises and a bite mark in the struggle.


More Like This From Around The NRA