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Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Alabama Homeowner Detains Intruder With Gun

According to WVTM 13, a 22-year-old man forced his way through the front door of a home in Gadsden, Ala., and accosted the 60-year-old woman inside. She grabbed a firearm and warned him that she would shoot if he moved.

Police came to collect the suspect, who claimed that he entered the house because someone was chasing him. A neighbor expressed shock that the incident occurred, describing the area as “… a very quiet street. Everybody stays to their self.” It’s a good thing for the homeowner that she was ready and able to deal with the unexpected.


Nassau County DA Drops No-Guns Policy For Prosecutors

After increasing public scrutiny, acting Nassau County, N.Y., District Attorney Madeline Singas rescinded a policy that prohibited prosecutors from having handguns. Earlier this month, UCLA constitutional law professor Eugene Volokh wrote a blog post for the Washington Post, raising questions about the policy’s constitutionality. The policy and its surrounding controversy quickly became the subject of local and national news stories.

For nearly a decade, Nassau County assistant district attorneys on New York’s Long Island were barred from owning handguns. As part of the application process, prospective candidates were required to agree to the policy, forbidding them from having a handgun on the job and at home. The policy was reversed Wednesday after days of pressure from the media and gun rights organizations. Under the new policy, prosecutors are now permitted to own handguns, but are still prohibited from possessing them while they’re on duty in their office or at crime scenes. 


Two Industry Groups Appeal California Microstamping Case

The National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF) and the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers’ Institute (SAAMI) are seeking an appeal in their legal fight against California’s 2007 law requiring that new handguns incorporate “microstamping” technology to qualify for sale in the state. 

The original suit, filed last year, was dismissed in July by a California judge who cited sovereign immunity—the idea that “the King can do no wrong”—to wave away the inconvenient fact that microstamping is not only easily defeated by criminals and unworkable on a practical level, but also economically impossible to implement as mandated by the law.

 To qualify for legal sale under California’s “Unsafe Handgun Act,” handguns must have a variety of arbitrary characteristics including, beginning in 2007, “microstamping” technology on new firearms. In part as a result, the number of models that may be legally sold has dropped by 30 percent in less than two years


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