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Saturday, November 21, 2015

San Francisco Proposes More Gun-Control Legislation

There’s no longer a single place to buy guns in San Francisco—the last gun shop shut down due to onerous gun-control regulations—and still the city is coming after your guns. The latest proposal would ban the storage of firearms in any unattended vehicle in the city unless they are secured in lockboxes or in the trunk.

Supervisor David Campos’ proposal comes about in the wake of a rash of firearms stolen from parked cars. The legislation has been approved in committee and will go before the full board. If passed, it would be the first such law in California. But if Campos has his way, it wouldn’t be the last.

“Hopefully once we pass this piece of legislation in San Francisco, the rest of the state can follow suit,” Campos said. “We have to make it inconvenient for people to carry weapons,” added San Francisco Supervisor London Breed.


Poll Shows That D.C. Gun Control Mostly Supported By Affluent White Residents

A Washington Post survey of 1,005 D.C. residents revealed that those typically at least risk of becoming crime victims are most in favor of banning guns. 

Sixty-one percent of those earning over $100,000/year favored banning guns; that number dropped to 40 percent among those making under $50,000. Race mattered, too: Sixty-two percent of whites support bans (among college-educated whites, 67 percent). Black respondents, especially those in high-crime areas, were least likely to favor gun prohibition. Overall, 51 percent of respondents favored a gun ban, while 47 percent opposed it.

Given what we’ve seen from anti-gun politicians, it’s unsurprising that those who can afford to live in safer areas didn’t value armed self-defense as much as those who actually encounter crime regularly. However, even though a majority favors gun bans, nearly 60 percent feel they wouldn’t make D.C. any safer—implying that some people just want to “do something,” even if they know it won’t work.


Lawyers Examine Distant History As “Good Reason” Case Kicks Off

The District of Columbia’s “good reason” requirement for the issuance of a concealed-carry permit is under review by the district’s federal appeals court. Much of the debate on Friday centered over the legitimacy of the injunction decided by District Court Judge Frederick J. Scullen Jr., who determined that the requirement is at variance with the Second Amendment.

The crucial nature of this case has inspired some unusual and detailed historical analysis from both sides in the debate. Attorneys for the city and Everytown for Gun Safety pointed to an English statute from 1328 (before firearms were available in the country), while a brief whose authors included the legal team from the California Rifle and Pistol Association pointed to a 1686 ruling acquitting a man who carried a gun in public. Both sides want to come away from this case with bulletproof legal precedent and will go back as far as necessary to build it.


Ohio Homeowner Shoots Two Home Invasion Suspects

Two suspected robbers were shot during a home invasion in Columbus, Ohio, Monday morning. According to police, the two suspects broke into a home around midnight; the homeowner opened fire at the alleged intruders, hitting both of them. WBNS reports that both suspects fled the scene, having apparently suffered gunshot wounds.   

Police found the getaway car stopped two blocks away. An ambulance picked up one shooting victim, while the other proceeded on foot to a nearby hospital. Both suspects are expected to survive, and there have been no reports regarding injuries or charges pertaining to the armed homeowner.


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