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Thursday, April 16, 2015

Kroger Stands Up—Again

Shannon Watts of Moms Demand Action might have been out-enthused by NRA members in Nashville last week—at the rate of roughly 520-to-1—but she certainly seems determined. In the wake of Kroger’s polite refusal to ban firearms carry in their stores, Watts has now made her group’s boycott of the grocery giant “official.”

Two inconvenient details make any celebration premature. First, Kroger CFO Michael Schlotman once again took the high road and deferred to local and state statutes as the authority on permissible carry modes. Second, and understandably closer to a chief financial officer’s heart, may be the fact that Kroger’s profit jumped 21 percent after the company’s first repudiation of a threatened boycott last year.

Just sayin’: Shop at Kroger (and Harris Teeter or Fred Meyer).


Mark Kelly Just “Liked” Eddie Eagle

“I don’t agree w/ the @NRA on some big issues, but they deserve a lot of credit for teaching kids about gun safety. Eddieeagle.com”

That tweet was from Mark Kelly, husband of Gabby Giffords and co-founder of anti-gun group Americans For Responsible Solutions. NRA doesn’t agree with Kelly on much, either, but we agree that any creditable, effective effort to protect children from firearm accidents should be lauded.

However, self-described “gun guy” Mike Weisser of The Huffington Post doesn’t agree. Instead, he attacked Eddie Eagle, calling it “the NRA’s poster child for making everyone believe that the organization represents a positive force.” 

Fact is, Eddie Eagle has reached more than 28 million children to date. Materials are distributed free to schools, funded by the 5 million NRA members, most of whom are actual gun guys ... unlike Weisser. 


Campus Carry Bill Shot Down In Florida Senate?

A Florida campus carry bill may be stalled in the Florida Senate amidst concerns from University of South Florida faculty. Despite the fact that Senate Bill 176 wouldn’t allow anyone to carry a concealed firearm who isn’t already permitted to do so by law—and the fact that seven states have already enacted similar legislation and seen no uptick in crime—the USF faculty union has gone on record opposing the legislation, saying they’re “uncomfortable” with it. In response to the outcry, Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Miguel Diaz de la Portilla told the News Service of Florida last week that he doesn’t plan to have the bill go before his committee.

HB 4005, a similar bill sponsored by Rep. Greg Steube, has cleared its final committee hurdle in the House and is set for scheduling on the House floor in the two weeks remaining in the session.


Homemade Guns Flood Mexican Buyback Program

The United States isn’t the only country where gun buybacks function as a misguided attempt to reduce the number of firearms on the streets. Now a program in Mexico is netting guns of questionable quality, while possibly serving as a money-making opportunity for those capable of throwing together crude firearms.

Reports indicate that all sorts of homemade guns have been turned in, from zip guns to .22 machine pistols to antique designs such as revolving rifles. One has to wonder how many of these strange artifacts were actually made to be shot, and how many were made strictly to be sold to authorities.


Pizza Delivery Driver Foils Armed Robbery Attempt

The driver for a pizza joint in Douglas, Ga., must have looked like an easy mark to Antavious McTear, who allegedly accosted him with a pipe and demanded money during a delivery. But when the driver responded by pulling out a gun, McTear fled the scene in his car.

McTear was later apprehended by law enforcement officers, who promptly deposited him in the Coffee County Jail. The driver was unharmed in the incident.


Wal-Mart Court Update

In a lawsuit filed by New York City’s Trinity Church and intended to stop Wal-Mart from selling so-called “high-capacity guns,” a federal appeals court has ruled in favor of Wal-Mart, reversing an earlier federal court decision and effectively upholding decisions by Wal-Mart’s management regarding firearms sales at their stores.

Trinity Church, which owns $2,000 in Wal-Mart stock, sought to allow shareholders to block sales of firearms at the retail giant through a simple majority vote. Wal-Mart argued that such decisions were the proper purview of the board of directors, not all shareholders—a view the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission appeared to validate. Last November, U.S. District Judge Leonard Stark—an Obama appointee—ruled in favor of Trinity Church and its scheme to block firearm sales. But this latest decision, reversing Stark’s ruling, restores Wal-Mart’s corporate control over the issue and appears to protect Wal-Mart firearms sales—at least for the time being.


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