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Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Florida Homeowner Takes Down Burglary Suspects

A 77-year-old man in Miami-Dade County, Fla., was in the shower when he reportedly heard unexpected noises in his house. He went to investigate and encountered two men who appeared to be burglarizing the home. The homeowner opened fire, killing one of the intruders and wounding a second, who was airlifted to a nearby hospital.

A neighbor reported that burglaries were common in the neighborhood and that the homeowner in question had been robbed before. “I think he’s 100 percent correct,” she said of his actions.


A “Wake-Up Call” All Right, But To What?

The usual suspects—Moms Demand Action and the Brady Campaign, to name just a few—aren’t waiting for a factual report on the biker shootout in Waco, Texas, before calling for draconian public policy changes. As they do after every obviously criminal abuse, they stoke the media emotion machine and set out again to stomp on the Bill of Rights. There is no evidence that the likes of Michael Bloomberg, Shannon Watts and Dan Gross make any material distinction between the (overtly criminal) Waco combatants and law-abiding gun owners.

If they hoodwink Texans into their “background checks for everything” scheme, criminal enterprises will simply turn for their guns to the same place they turn for the illegal drugs that often fund their operations—black markets. Only you will be left with firearms that can be confiscated using improperly (or even illegally) retained background-check data.


Judge Rules D.C.’s “Good Reason” Requirement Not Good Enough

Affirming that D.C.’s “good reason” requirement for concealed-carry permits violates the Second Amendment, a federal judge on Monday issued a preliminary injunction against the District. In a 23-page opinion, U.S. District Judge Frederick Scullin said that because the three plaintiffs—denied permits by Police Chief Cathy Lanier, who has sole authority to decide who “deserves” a permit—were likely to win their case, the District cannot continue enforcing the law.

The judge noted that the issue isn’t whether “good reason” is a reasonable policy choice, but rather whether it’s constitutional. “For all intents and purposes, this requirement makes it impossible for the overwhelming majority of law-abiding citizens to obtain licenses to carry handguns in public for self-defense, thereby depriving them of their Second Amendment right to bear arms.” 

The Metropolitan P.D. reported that out of 70 concealed-carry applications filed from October through February, only 11 have been approved.


Fear And Hoarding In Canada

Canada’s 2 million gun owners are concerned. Their angst over ammo—or rather the quickly diminishing supply thereof—has led our northern neighbors to start hoarding .22-caliber ammunition, according to a report from the National Post.

Nearly all of Canada’s ammunition comes from the United States. But of the 4.2 billion rounds of .22 shells produced each year, 4 billion go to meet domestic demand—leaving very little for distribution in Canada. So Canadians are stockpiling, not only because availability is dwindling, but because prices are skyrocketing. Gun owners are shelling out up to $70 for 500 shells—what used to cost just $20.

“People are waiting outside places like Wal-Mart and Canadian Tire to purchase mass quantities, keeping it for themselves or reselling it," said Blair Hagen, executive vice president of Canada’s National Firearms Association.


Baltimore’s Mean Streets

The riots might be over, but the killing continues in Baltimore, where police morale is very low and some officers are reportedly fearful to do their job. 

According to a report in The Washington Post, between mid-April and mid-May, 31 people were killed and another 39 wounded in shootings on Baltimore’s streets. Consequently the city’s homicide total for 2015 has climbed to 91—21 more than this time last year.

Lt. Kenneth Butler, president of a group for black police officers, told the Post that officers are more reluctant than ever to do the work that needs done. “Officers are coming to me and saying, ‘I’m afraid to do my job,’” Butler said, adding that officers, both black and white, are “equally upset; their morale is low.”


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