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Saturday, July 18, 2015

Houston Convenience Store Clerk Shoots Two Armed Robbers

After a July 1 robbery resulted in a clerk being beaten so badly he still hasn’t returned to work, Super K convenience store owner Alden Tu and his brother, clerk Dien Tu, armed themselves to prevent being victimized again. “Everyone has guns in the store—it’s so dangerous, this kind of job,” Alden Tu told KTRK-13.

Unfortunately, last Monday—less than two weeks later—Tu’s southwest Houston Super K was hit again. While a getaway driver waited outside, three masked men entered the store, pistol-whipped the clerk on duty, then turned their attention to the register. When one of the men pulled a gun on him, Dien Tu, who was on break near the cooler, pulled out his gun and fired at the suspects, striking two. Police say after the suspects fled, they dumped the two injured suspects at a nearby apartment complex. They were taken to a local hospital, but reportedly did not survive.


Another Shabby Story Makes Big Anti-Gun News

The Washington Post, Baltimore Sun, Newsweek, US News and World Report and Philadelphia Enquirer—among many others—have all gushed recently with some variation on the story that “Strict Licensing in Connecticut Cut Firearms Homicides by 40 percent,” according to the American Journal of Public Health.

Hold on just one teeny, tiny, itsy-bitsy minute, says Dr. John Lott: Without cherry-picking, omissions and distortions in the data, it simply isn’t true. Perhaps worse, he continues, is, “Why the authors … chose to ignore other violent crimes also becomes clear pretty quickly. Relative to the rest of the United States, Connecticut’s overall violent crime rate, as well as its robbery and aggravated assault rates, were clearly falling prior to the 1995 law and rising afterwards.” 


“A Robber’s Here, Daddy”

Eldorado, Ohio, is a quiet little village in southwestern Ohio with a population of a little more than 500. In a town that size, people can spot trouble quickly, and one toddler did just that last week. The 3-year-old had been outside playing with a sibling around dinnertime when the child went rushing into the house saying, “A robber’s here, daddy.”

Moments later, that robber burst in. The intruder was armed, had his face covered with a bandana and was wearing a hat. He yelled an obscenity, but those would be the last words he ever spoke. The father fired a single shot to his chest, fatally wounding him. The parents and children were unharmed.

The break-in is still under investigation, but it appears to be an isolated incident. Police don’t expect any charges to be filed against the homeowner, who acted in self-defense.


Judge Says Firearms Speech Ban Is Likely Unconstitutional

District Court Judge Troy L. Nunley has denied an injunction on a California law prohibiting firearms-related speech from gun dealers, allowing the ban to remain in effect until the trial progresses further. At issue is Section 26820 of the California Penal Code, which keeps dealers from displaying any “handgun or imitation handgun, or [a] placard advertising the sale or other transfer thereof.” This restriction makes it very hard to attract business.

While Judge Nunley allowed the ban to stand for now, he acknowledged that it is probably unconstitutional. He predicted it was “more likely than not” that the plaintiffs would succeed on the grounds that their First Amendment rights are being violated.


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