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Monday, July 20, 2015

More Bad News From “Charm City”

Baltimore, where violent crime is running rampant, is suspending a local anti-crime program after police seized guns and other contraband from one of the program’s offices, according to a Washington Times report.

The “Safe Streets” program employs ex-felons who have "street creds" in an effort to reduce shootings and build rapport with youth. It has apparently enjoyed some success; however, in 2010 the FBI tied one of the program’s sites to a local gang, and in 2013 the city temporarily suspended the program due to allegation of criminal activities by its employees.

Among those arrested this week on gun and narcotics charges is a man previously sentenced to 12 years in prison on narcotics charges, another twice acquitted of murder, and two others arrested on robbery and assault charges in the incident that led police to investigate Safe Streets this time.


Another Good Guy With A Rifle

For the second time in three weeks, armed Americans have protected themselves and their families with AK-47 rifles. In the first instance, in late June, a Vegas man shot two armed suspects who had barged into his home. More recently, a Houston man used his AK-47 last Thursday to defend himself in an early morning break-in attempt.

According to police, at about 4 a.m. the homeowner heard his burglar alarm sounding. Checking the alarm, he found that someone had attempted to break his son’s bedroom window and had already broken one lock.  

The homeowner ran out of the house with his AK-47, was shot at by an accomplice near a car parked there, and returned fire. Two men then came running from behind the house where the break-in was taking place, and the homeowner shot one of them before they all fled. At last report, all three remain at large.


Measure Would Create Backdoor Gun Prohibition

U.S. Rep. James Clyburn, D-S.C., has introduced a bill that would in effect vastly expand federal prohibited person categories—exploiting a recent tragedy and media misinformation.

The bill seeks to repeal a critical safety valve in federal law that allows for a firearm transfer to proceed three business days after a NICS check is initiated, provided “the system has not notified the [FFL] that the receipt of a firearm by [the buyer or transferee] would [violate federal law.]” This provision ensures that Americans’ rights to acquire firearms are not arbitrarily denied because of bureaucratic delays, inefficiencies or mistakes in identity.

According the most recent FBI report, 9 percent of NICS checks in 2014 were delayed “for additional review,” affecting nearly 750,000 people. In more than 99.6 percent of delayed cases, the delay was less than three days, the FBI could not substantiate the person was prohibited, or the FFL did not transfer the firearm—hardly the sign of a public safety crisis.


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