Explore The NRA Universe Of Websites

APPEARS IN First Things First
Saturday, July 4, 2015

NRA Instructor Schools County Election Board

A Douglasville, Ga., man who was told he couldn’t wear his NRA hat at the polls has agreed to drop his lawsuit against county and election officials.

Bundy Cobb, veteran and owner of True Aim Defense, wears his “NRA Instructor” hat everywhere to advertise his business. But after he arrived at his polling place for early voting last October, workers there told him to remove it. 

When Cobb asked why, he was told that since NRA was perceived as being “associated with the Republican party,” the hat could be considered illegal campaign material—even though no gun initiatives were on the ballot that day.

In December, Cobb filed a lawsuit claiming his civil rights were violated. Fortunately, because the Board of Elections and Registration has since agreed to remove its prohibition on clothing or materials referring to a person, organization or viewpoint not on the ballot, Cobb was able to drop his suit.