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Wednesday, August 19, 2015

Ohio Legislator Proposes Firearm “Safe Storage” Mandate ... Again

For the third time in three years, Cleveland State Rep. Bill Patmon has proposed legislation requiring that firearms stored in the home be locked away—and thus inaccessible for immediate self-defense—with criminal penalties for violators.

While storing firearms safely is an obvious concern for any gun owner, there’s no evidence that a “one size fits all” mandate will protect anyone, except possibly violent home invaders emboldened by the knowledge that homeowners have been effectively disarmed. Prosecutors already have the ability to charge gun owners if their reckless behavior results in the death or injury of children.

Moreover, it has been education—not legislation—that has reduced gun accidents among children, and Americans of all ages, to the lowest levels recorded in a century. Efforts like the NRA’s Eddie Eagle program have helped reduce accidental firearm fatalities among children by 89 percent over the past 40 years.


Armed Neighbors Stop Alabama Home Invasion

Talk about Southern hospitality. When Alabama resident Wilma Williams awoke to find an unexpected and unwelcome visitor at her door, the 69-year-old raced to get her pistol. Craig Steven Moore, 44, broke into her home and tussled with Williams until wresting the gun from her. Moore shot at her twice and missed before Williams was able to get away and call 911 and a neighbor. 

The neighbor wasted no time—he met up with his nearby father-in-law and the two headed over to help, firearms in hand. After a scuffle, the two men were able to fight off Moore, eventually shooting him non-fatally and holding him until police arrived.

Moore is now facing eight felony charges including attempted murder, attempted assault, burglary and robbery. “She showed me the holes in the wall,” said one neighbor. “There was a big tuft of her hair in the bullet hole. That’s how close he came to killing her.”


Shooter’s Grill: The Safest Restaurant In America?

Gun signs posted outside restaurants typically include a red circle and slash. But the sign at Shooter’s Grill reads, “Guns Are Welcome on Premises.”

Shooter’s is located in Rifle, Colo., a city on the Colorado River boasting a large number of hunters and outdoorsmen. It began in 2013 as a typical eatery, but when a man was murdered in the restaurant’s alley a month after it opened, owner Lauren Boebert decided to start carrying—and encouraged her employees and customers to follow suit. 

Today, patrons can choose from items like the “Shotgun Burrito” or the “Locked-and-Loaded Nachos,”—all delivered by waitresses with holstered, loaded guns. (All staff complete weapons training courses prior to carrying on the job.) 

The decision to allow guns has proved a popular one: Armed townspeople, visitors and even celebrities are flocking to the restaurant. Of course, those who disagree are free to take their business—and their chances—elsewhere.


North Dakota And Minnesota Reach Reciprocity Agreement

North Dakota and Minnesota have reached an agreement on firearms license reciprocity.

North Dakota Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem announced Wednesday that Minnesota will recognize Class 1 licenses from North Dakota but not Class 2 licenses, which don’t require a shooting proficiency test, effective immediately. 

Stenehjem said that his office had tried for about a decade to gain reciprocity in Minnesota, but Minnesota’s requirement that another state’s laws be “substantially” similar to its own prevented the efforts.

Earlier this year, the Minnesota legislature removed the word  “substantially” from the requirement, and the Minnesota Department of Public Safety determined Tuesday that North Dakota’s laws met the new standard. 

The decision also affects Minnesotans who had their North Dakota concealed weapon licenses suspended two years ago after the North Dakota legislature changed the eligibility law for non-residents. Those Minnesotans can now apply to the North Dakota Bureau of Criminal Investigation to have their licenses reinstated.


NICS Update Postponed To 2016

A planned update to the FBI’s National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) is now set for January of 2016.

Originally slated for July 2015, the delay is to prevent interruptions of FFL background checks in the busy fall (hunting) season and holiday firearms sales. These periods are generally “peak season” for NICS use.

The delay will also permit employees to better learn the changes and cut down on errors. There’s also concern about a significant election-year bump in sales: The FBI wants the “New NICS” to be able to handle an anticipated spike in advance of the 2016 presidential election.


South Carolina State Senator Readies Anti-Gun Onslaught

In the wake of the tragic shooting in Charleston, S.C., one legislator is trying to leverage public outrage to push through a number of radical anti-gun measures. Democrat State Sen. Marlon Kimpson has summarized the bills that he is preparing to introduce in the state Senate, and they include just about every intrusive or restrictive policy you could think of: Adding a state-level background check (while eliminating the federal three-day “loophole”), banning every firearm defined as an “assault weapon,” requiring a permit to purchase a gun and more.

It is unlikely that Sen. Kimpson’s bills will gain much traction. According to Republican Sen. Larry Martin, who heads the Senate Judiciary Committee, “There is absolutely no appetite for gun control or gun registration.” Even if there was, it is hard to imagine an agenda as extreme as Kimpson’s gaining the support of the state’s legislators and constituents.


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