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Thursday, August 20, 2015

Louisiana Sheriff Faces Backlash For Encouraging Women To Use Firearms

According to The Times-Picayune, 45-year-old Monica Johnson of Geismar, La., was brutally bludgeoned to death with a baseball bat by her estranged husband. Police found her body in her backyard and the back door shattered. 

Ascension Parish Sheriff Jeff Wiley responded to the grisly murder, saying, “Get your concealed weapons permit. Ladies, learn how to safely handle a weapon, learn how to safely store a weapon, and when you’re in a situation like this, shoot him in your back yard before he gets in your house. Drop him.” 

The sheriff admitted it may sound radical, but said that extreme violence requires extraordinary efforts for protection. The Left quickly rallied against Wiley’s advice, claiming that women who wield guns against abusers are more likely to have the gun turned against them.

Can detractors honestly believe that Monica Johnson was better off without a firearm to protect herself? It’s too bad we can’t ask her.


3 Criminals, 2 Incidents, 1 Armed Citizen, 0 Shots Fired

Last Saturday night was an eventful one for a Yakima, Wash., homeowner. He and his girlfriend returned home at about 5 p.m. to find that clothing, electronics and cellphones had been stolen from his house. Soon after, the back door opened and two men entered—one of them wearing a necklace, hat and shirt stolen from the residence. The homeowner, a concealed-carry permit holder, held the men at gunpoint and contacted police, who found a stolen vehicle near the residence that they later tied to the suspects.

About two hours later, police were again called to the home when the homeowner returned from dropping his girlfriend off to find someone looking through his windows. The man claimed to be cutting through the yard—but he was behaving erratically, and the homeowner’s yard is completely fenced. The homeowner held the trespasser for police, who arrested him on suspicion of criminal trespass and methamphetamine and paraphernalia possession.


Court Allows NFL Gun Ban To Continue … For Now

The Minnesota Court of Appeals ruled that the National Football League’s ban on guns inside stadiums on game days could be applied to off-duty officers under the terms of the state’s Citizens’ Personal Protection Act (PPA). A county judge had previously determined that the officers had a right to carry at all times guaranteed by the PPA.

While this ruling carries a feeling of disappointment, the court was clear that this need not be the final word on whether off-duty law enforcement can carry in stadiums. The ruling pertains only to the PPA, not to any other state or federal law that could override the NFL’s ban.


Fingerprint Problems Prompt Permit Revocations In Utah

Utah is revoking concealed-carry permits at near-record rates, but not because permit holders are breaking the law. Of the 399 pulled this year, 323 have been for the same reason—unreadable fingerprints.

Previously, permits couldn’t be rejected for fingerprint problems — instead, a new set of prints would be required at the time a license came up for renewal. A change to state law, though, now stipulates that when fingerprints are deemed insufficient, an applicant has 30 days to submit a new set. After 30 days, the permit is suspended. After one year, the permit is revoked.

“It’s not necessarily that the person did anything bad if we’re taking their permit away,” said Jason Chapman of the Utah Bureau of Criminal Identification. “We just couldn’t complete background checks.” 

With its concealed-carry license recognized in 35 states, Utah is a popular state for permit seekers. Almost two-thirds of the 612,000 people with Utah permits are from other states.


Canada To Delay UN Gun-Tracing Measure—Again

Adoption of regulations that would require domestic and imported firearms in Canada to be marked by manufacturer, serial number and “Canada” or “CA” have been delayed for a seventh time. The regs are intended to meet international protocols from both the UN and OAS (Organization of American States). 

To the delay, we say, “Yessssss!”

It makes sense to drop the plan altogether, as Canada’s National Firearms Association suggests. First, neither the UN nor OAS is any friend to civil firearms ownership, nor have they ever been. Second, such marking for the stated purpose of tracing is notoriously ineffective: Of the tiny percentage of firearms used in crimes, only two percent of those are usefully traced. 

Lastly, the one thing such markings and their subsequent lists of owners are good for is confiscation, as oft-repeated history uniformly shows. There’s one good thing to do with the plan: Scrap it!


Hillary Clinton Calls For Stand Your Ground Laws To Be “Rewritten”

Surrounded by armed Secret Service agents at a town hall event in Las Vegas on Tuesday, Hillary Clinton criticized “Stand Your Ground” laws, which allow lawful citizens in imminent danger of death or grave bodily harm to meet force with force against criminal attack. 

“I just think a lot of these ‘Stand Your Ground’ laws need to be rewritten,” Clinton said. “If somebody is breaking into your home and you are in imminent danger, or you go to your door and you see something that is deeply concerning, well, first thing you should do is call 911,” Clinton said. 

When you have 24/7/365 taxpayer-funded Secret Service protection for life, like Clinton has, it’s easy to dismiss the security concerns of “ordinary” Americans. But the truth is that less than 5 percent of the 911 calls dispatched to police are made quickly enough for officers to stop a crime or arrest a suspect.


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