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Thursday, September 10, 2015

Cuomo Calls For More Gun Control

An attorney in New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s administration was tragically shot in the head on Monday and is in critical condition. The shooting occurred at 3:40 a.m. amid celebrations of West Indian American Day. Reports indicate a dispute broke out between rival gangs, resulting in gunfire, and Carey Gabay was caught in the crossfire.

In the aftermath of the shooting, Gov. Cuomo has since declared that anyone who doesn’t believe federal gun-control laws are needed is “delusional.” He has also renewed his call for an overhaul of national gun laws to stem the flow of firearms to criminals. 

Apparently the proponent of the ironically named SAFE Act believes just a few more gun-control laws would have prevented gang members from getting their guns. Should we be on the lookout for the ULTRA SAFE Act, coming soon?


Anti-Gun Groups, AGs Mount Defense Of Bad D.C. Law

The legality of D.C.’s “good reason” clause for concealed-carry permits continues to be at issue, and now a number of state officials—along with the usual anti-gun lobbying organizations—are rushing to its defense. According to WAMU, the attorneys general of Maryland, California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Massachusetts and New York filed an amicus brief in defense of the law to the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. Also participating were the Brady Campaign and local groups including D.C. Appleseed and D.C. Vote.

The most recent verdict on the issue was from Judge Frederick Scullin, who threw out the clause putting the burden on concealed-carry permit applicants to explain why they need a gun. But his ruling was stayed by the appeals court, which will soon hear arguments for and against the law. NRA has announced that it will file a brief arguing for the “good cause” clause to be dropped.


D.C. Mayor, Police Chief Might Finally Be Onto Something

Speaking of the District of Columbia, in a move that makes much more sense than further restricting gun ownership by law-abiding citizens, Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser and Police Chief Cathy Lanier are calling for heightened attention on repeat violent offenders.

Lanier told the Washington Post that more than half of the suspects arrested in this year’s homicides had prior gun arrests in the District. She also said that 21 homicide suspects and 26 homicide victims were under court supervision, such as probation, at the time of the killings. Additionally, 10 homicide suspects and six homicide victims had faced prior charges in killings.

Consequently, Lanier is calling for heightened attention to how gun offenders with previous convictions or run-ins with the law are handled by police, courts, prosecutors and probation agents. “To take guns off the same person over and over and over again is just unacceptable,” Lanier told the Post.


U.S. Attorney Waffles Over “Fast And Furious” Discussion

The sooner the U.S. government can present a winning case against the last two accomplices in the 2010 murder of Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry, the better pleased we’ll be, period. (Five other defendants accepted plea deals.)

The latest hiccup in the proceedings stems from the request by the suspects’ attorneys to discuss Operation Fast and Furious, BATFE’s phenomenally ill-planned gunwalking operation. The Obama Justice Department would love to let this fade from public memory, but the broad strokes are simple: BATFE co-opted dealers to sell to illegal buyers, and then promptly lost track of 1,400 rifles and handguns. The killing of Terry is not the only murder to which the firearms have been linked.

We hope the evidence will be overwhelming and convictions rapidly result. But such angling to avoid more talk of the “Fast and Furious” embarrassment is utterly unconscionable if it puts at risk the already-minimal standard of justice for Brian Terry.


Lawsuit Aims To Protect Parking Lot Carry At FSU

A lawsuit was filed Tuesday against Florida State University over their “Game Day Plan 2015” guide. The suit, filed by Florida Carry on behalf of FSU graduate student Rebekah Hargrove, concerns a section stating weapons are banned on campus, and fans “may not store firearms … in their vehicles parked on campus while attending the game.”

Florida law permits law-abiding citizens to lock legally owned firearms in vehicles. An exception exists for schools—however, in 2013 the 1st District Court of Appeals overturned a University of North Florida policy prohibiting this practice. The plaintiffs argue the Guide fails to abide by this ruling, and are seeking an injunction before this Saturday’s game.

A news release by the group Florida Carry calls the Guide a “blatant attempt” to “enforce illegal gun control with the threat of throwing good people in jail for the lawful exercise of their right to bear arms.” University administrators have so far declined to comment.


Hartford Homeowner Thwarts Home Invasion

Police in Hartford, Conn., received reports of shots being fired in connection with a home invasion in progress just before 11 p.m. When officers arrived they were told that the two suspects had approached the homeowner and pointed a gun at him.

The homeowner, who is a legal pistol permit holder, was armed at the time and used his firearm to shoot the suspects several times. Both suspects were taken to a local hospital, where they are listed in critical but stable condition. Officers also located a gun and zip-ties on the suspects, indicating a premeditated intention to enter the house while people were present and likely do much harm.

The homeowner, who has not been charged, suffered minor injuries during the incident. A woman and child also at the residence were uninjured. Surveillance cameras at the home were able to capture video of the incident, which is being reviewed as part of the police investigation.


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