Explore The NRA Universe Of Websites

APPEARS IN First Things First
Friday, September 11, 2015

BATFE Keeps Withholding Documents, But Admits To Being An Agency

According to last month’s filing in a New York federal court, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (BATFE) says documents requested through a Freedom of Information Act request by Everytown for Gun Safety are exempt from disclosure. The gun-control group sued the agency in July for the “time to crime” element of the trace data collected from 1998 to 2005, which they say the agency withheld when it released documents from a previous request. 

BATFE’s answer denies Everytown’s allegations that it failed to respond to requests and says its actions are supported by the FOIA law. BATFE also recently denied allegations in a separate ongoing lawsuit over a FOIA request by pro-gun advocates. Oddly enough, last month the BATFE said that it’s not an “agency” within the context of FOIA law in its answer to a different request. At least this time they have explicitly admitted to being a law enforcement agency within the Department of Justice.


D.C. Residents Left Disarmed And Defenseless

All summer long, rising violence has been the leading story in Washington, D.C. On Aug. 3, law-enforcement officials from several cities—including the District—met to discuss the spike in big-city crime and possible solutions. One of the summit’s organizers was D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier. Among the recommendations: More stringent gun laws, including harsher penalties for gun crimes and use of “high-capacity” magazines. 

Given that agenda, this latest information out of D.C. should come as no surprise—of the 206 concealed-carry applications filed with the Metropolitan Police Department, only 44 have been approved. So despite the nearly daily headlines on D.C.’s violence, the MPD has approved less than one-quarter of applicants seeking protection when they need it the most. Instead of stumping for more gun laws, Lanier would do well to learn a lesson from the story of New Jersey’s Carol Bowne—she, too, was disarmed when she needed protection the most.


Boston Targeting Law-Abiding To Combat Violence

In an attempt to reduce violent crime in the city, Boston Mayor Marty Walsh and Police Commissioner William Evans are doing exactly what criminals probably prefer they do—harass law-abiding gun owners who have nothing to do with criminal violence.

According to a report by CBS Boston, the city will be sending a letter to every licensed gun owner in the city detailing information about reporting a private gun sale, loss or theft, which seems quite reasonable. Then the letter goes too far, suggesting that gun owners can trade their guns in to the city for a $200 gift card. 

We’re not sure what’s more frightening—the fact that Boston city officials have the address of every law-abiding gun owner, or that they think “buying back” guns from the law-abiding is a way of solving the problem of violent crime.


FSU’s New Parking Lot Carry Policy A Turnover, But No Touchdown

Just one day after a lawsuit was filed against Florida State University regarding its firearms policies, the school has decided to revise its stance.

The school announced Wednesday that a section in their 2015 Game Day Guide stating fans “may not store firearms … in their vehicles parked on campus while attending the game” had been removed. The guide now states concealed-carry permit holders can keep firearms in their cars if they are “securely encased in the vehicle.”

Florida Carry, however, said the new policies are “wholly insufficient,” and that they plan to continue with the lawsuit. Currently, only concealed-carry permit holders are allowed parking lot carry rights—but Florida Carry believes any law-abiding gun owner should be able to keep a firearm in his/her locked vehicle in accordance with Florida law. The group also believes parking lot carry should apply not just to football fans, but also visitors and students attending class.


Tucson City Council Draws Up New Gun-Control Package

Focusing largely on a campus shooting that took place in 2002—more than a dozen years ago—City Council leaders in Tucson, Ariz., unanimously passed a memorial resolution asking firearms retailers to follow a set of procedures corresponding to the Brady Bill code of conduct. The articles in this resolution are generally vague, but the more concrete measures include not making a sale until a federal background check is complete and recording transactions on video for the use of police.

Local NRA spokesman Todd Rathner criticized the resolution in a statement reported by Tucson News Now: “We got a city full of potholes, we’re losing cops, we have a Sun Tran strike—and they’re fiddling around with nonsensical memorial resolutions that do absolutely nothing about crime.”


90-Year-Old Scares Off Home Invader With Firearm

An elderly resident of Youngstown, Ohio, heard knocking on his front door, but he ignored it because it was after midnight. Shortly afterward he was alerted by the sound of glass breaking on his enclosed back porch. The 90-year-old resident secured a .357 Magnum and fired one shot in the direction of the home invader.

The suspect fled the premises before police arrived and is currently being sought. The resident—who would likely have been easily overpowered if not for his possession of a firearm—was not injured.


More Like This From Around The NRA