Explore The NRA Universe Of Websites

From The Editor | How To Lose Your Kids In Vegas

From The Editor | How To Lose Your Kids In Vegas

A situation in Las Vegas, where the Clark County Department of Family Services has stripped foster parents of three children under their care just because they are gun owners, reeks of anti-gun elitism in the very worst way.

Kristi and Rod Beber, who have fostered more than 100 children, had their foster license revoked after it became known that Rod Beber is a gun owner.

According to local channel KSNV News 3, in April the Bebers awoke to screaming outside of their home. Rod retrieved a handgun, while Kristi called 911.

“You want to protect your family and your house,” Rod told KSNV. “As a (Right-to-Carry permit) holder, one of the first things you want to do is take control of the situation.”

What the agency doesn’t seem to realize is that, due to the fact Rod Beber has a firearm and has taken the necessary course to obtain his carry license, foster children in the Beber’s care are actually safer, not less safe or endangered. The incident ended when police arrived, and nobody was arrested or charged with a crime. But three months later, the DFS sent the Bebers a document citing a law that forbids any foster parent from having a loaded firearm in their home, and saying the incident “did not describe an adult exercising sound judgment.”

What the agency doesn’t seem to realize is that, due to the fact that Rod Beber has a firearm and has taken the necessary course to obtain his carry license, foster children in the Beber’s care are actually safer, not less safe or endangered. Taking away the Beber’s ability to provide care for those without a home due to an anti-gun attitude by agency administrators is nothing more than a cruel injustice.

Fortunately, there are some in the Nevada Legislature who do understand that simple truth. In fact, state lawmakers recently made clear their intent that foster parents holding Right-to-Carry permits be allowed to possess loaded firearms in their homes and around foster children.

In June, Gov. Brian Sandoval signed Assembly Bill 167, which immediately took effect. The change in law makes clear that a foster parent may possess a loaded firearm on the premises of a foster home “[w]hen used for a lawful purpose, which may include, without limitation, for an educational or recreational purpose, for hunting, for the defense of a person or property, or to clean or service the firearm.”

The law also states, “A person who is authorized to possess a firearm on the premises of a family foster home … may carry a firearm on his or her person while in the presence of a foster child,” as long as the firearm is in a holster or secured case, is inaccessible to others, and, if the firearm is kept at the foster home, that they return the firearm to a locked container when not in use.

The legislation doesn’t help the Bebers, though, as it was still under consideration at the time of the incident. Still, neither Rod nor Kristi plan to give up anytime soon, choosing to fight what they know to be both an injustice and a travesty.

“He said, ‘You know what, Kris, we’re not going to close (this case),” Kristi Beber told KSNV. “This isn’t right, we’re not going to let this happen.”

Here’s hoping that the Bebers get their foster license back soon and can continue helping youngsters who so badly need a safe, loving home.