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Thursday, September 24, 2015

O’Malley Tries To Out-Clinton Hillary

Democratic presidential hopeful Martin O’Malley, in an apparent attempt to prove that he is more anti-gun than rival Hillary Clinton, has launched an attack on Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump for voicing his support of the Second Amendment. Among other things, Trump supports national Right-to-Carry reciprocity and doing away with semi-auto rifle bans and magazine limits.

“His proposal is just shameless pandering to the National Rifle Association—one of the most powerful special interest lobbies in the country,” O’Malley wrote in a fundraising email to supporters. “The only thing on which we agree is that our country has a problem with gun violence. But, unlike Donald Trump, I know that the only way to combat gun violence is by standing up to the NRA and implementing comprehensive gun safety laws.”

O’Malley’s continued support for gun-control schemes that only affect law-abiding Americans puts him squarely in step with Clinton—neither of whom must be our next president.


Poll: Most Say No To Federal Gun Control

A new Rasmussen poll reports that most voters don’t want the federal government to have the final say on gun ownership, nor do they want a country where only the government is armed. 

A national telephone survey “finds that just 34 percent of likely U.S. voters believe laws regarding the ownership of guns should be the responsibility of government.” Slightly more Americans believe it should be within the purview of state government, and far fewer than one in five would entrust gun regulations to local government. 

Rasmussen’s findings reflect the continuing trend to support gun rights found in every other national poll. A CNN poll found that 59 percent believe current gun laws are either just about right, or too restrictive; Zogby found independent voters side with Republicans in supporting Second Amendment rights; a YouGov poll found 52 percent of Americans feel comfortable seeing someone with a holstered handgun; and an earlier Rasmussen poll found 68 percent of Americans feel safer in a neighborhood with guns.


San Francisco Gun Shop Legislated Out Of Business

And then there were none. Come November, not a single gun store will exist in San Francisco after High Bridge Arms announced plans this week to close. The shop was the last holdout in a staunchly anti-gun climate. 

The final straw for High Bridge Arms was looming legislation that would mandate that all firearm and ammunition sales be videotaped and the data transmitted to the San Francisco Police Department. “What we don’t do is voluntarily give private information to the police department,” said High Bridge’s Steve Alcairo.

But with action expected on the proposal this month, that’s exactly what High Bridge would have been facing. Amid City Supervisor Mark Farrell claiming that more gun control equals less crime, he’d be wise to listen to fellow San Francisco resident and past “Top Shot” champion Chris Cheng, who reminds us that criminals will still be able to acquire their firearms.


CNN Champions New Study On Teens And Gun Laws

Anti-gun researcher David Hemenway is at it again. His latest co-authored study looked at a survey in which teenagers were asked, “During the past 30 days, on how many days did you carry a gun?” Breaking down answers by state, they established that states with more restrictive gun laws saw fewer youths carrying firearms.

This finding was of great interest to media outlets like CNN, which ran stories implying that strict gun-control laws are successful in terms of teens. But this narrative is based on the assumption that it is always bad for minors to have access to guns, and the researchers made no effort to distinguish law-abiding gun users from criminals.

The results are actually so obvious as to be nearly tautological—of course teens are less apt to engage in hunting, competitive shooting and plinking in the face of tight regulations. If anything, these findings imply that most youth are inclined to use guns for legitimate purposes, not criminal mayhem.


Your Tax Dollars Vs. Your Toys

BATFE is at it again with the announcement that the Can Cannon by X Products falls under NFA rules when it’s used on a rifle or pistol AR lower.

If you’re not familiar with this $400 gizmo, take a look here. The short version is that it launches weird stuff like soda cans and tennis balls. The projectile must be loaded by hand and fired with limited accuracy, and it will actually fall out of the barrel if you tip the muzzle down. It’s a toy

We can’t help wondering why an extremely powerful and sometimes wayward (remember “Fast and Furious”?) federal law enforcement agency is messing with a gadget like this—to what nefarious purpose do they think it can realistically be put? Keep in mind that virtually anything that is rigid, heavy or fast-moving can be transmogrified into a weapon of sorts.


Armed Senior Citizen Thwarts Attempted Robbery

A man shot and critically wounded a suspect who was trying to break into his home Tuesday morning in Phoenix. Phoenix police say that the incident occurred around 10:20 a.m. The homeowner, a man in his 60s, was home alone when he heard someone in his back yard and then glass breaking. He saw the suspect, around 17 to 20 years old, trying to enter through a window. The homeowner reportedly warned the suspect that he was armed and went to get his handgun. When he returned, the suspect was still trying to get in the house. 

“The homeowner reported perceiving a threat and fired at the subject, striking him,” police said in a statement. The suspect then tried to flee down an alley but collapsed several houses down, where emergency personnel found him. Paramedics treated the man and took him to a hospital in extremely critical condition. He is not expected to survive.


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