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From The Editor | Gun-Banners Worry About The Darndest Things

From The Editor | Gun-Banners Worry About The Darndest Things

Last week, a whiny anti-gun father made the news with a hand-wringing blog post about how scary people are who have NRA stickers on their vehicles. His silly rant was soon countered so thoroughly that he quickly disabled the comments, lest his feelings got hurt even more.

Other bloggers soon took him on, making him look utterly foolish.

Just four days later, a British newspaper with anti-gun leanings decided to make an issue of another, well, non-issue

The poorly written jumble of a headline in the U.K. Mirror read: “Babies named after guns on the rise in U.S. despite shooting sprees with thousands following trend.” As if that proclamation wasn’t silly enough, the story, written by Ruth Halkon, began: “Around 88 people are shot dead in the U.S. every day, but those horrifying statistics are not doing anything to dampen America’s love of weapons. In fact, a worryingly significant minority of parents are showing their devotion to the Second Amendment by naming their children after weapons.” 

Yes, folks, you read that right: The story is all about gun-loving Americans giving their children what Halkon calls “violent names,” like Hunter, or Gunner, or, God forbid, Barrett.It’s not enough that gun-banners want to roll back the Second Amendment until it’s a meaningless shell of the constitutional protection it was meant to be. Now some even want to tell us what we shouldn’t name our children and what kind of stickers not to put on our vehicles.

Halkon goes on to pontificate: “Gunner is the most popular choice for gun-toting parents, but other names like Trigger, Shooter, Caliber and Pistol are proving popular. Gunner was given to over 1,500 baby boys last year.”

Oh, the horror! But she didn’t stop there.

“Cannon is also in the boys’ top 1,000,” she warns. Yikes!

Even more of a sense of impending doom comes from Halkon’s next warning.

“The names of gun manufacturers are also soaring up the table, with Barrett, Remington, Kimber, Ruger, Wesson, Browning, Benelli, and Beretta popular choices,” she said. (Should someone tell her that nearly all gun manufacturer names were actually derived from a person’s name? What comes first …) 

In fact, Halkon’s battle against “violent” names doesn’t stop with gun owners. She says “violent parents” are also naming their kids after those more enamored with less modern weaponry.

“Archer was given to nearly 900 boys last year, with Arrow given to some children of both sexes and Fletcher is at number 760 in the top 1,000 baby names,” she warns her readers, doom seeming all but imminent as a result. 

In the end, Halkon speculates that it is the inadequate feeling of gun owners causing this “violent” naming phenomenon, wrapping up her story by quoting U.S. baby name blogger and author Laura Wattenberg: “Some gun owners perceive their lifestyle as being threatened by those who don’t understand them or share their values. Choosing a gun name, then, can summon up happy memories of hunting with your dad—or be a statement of cultural defiance.” 

Or perhaps, as I suspect in most cases, the parents just happen to like the sound of those particular names. 

It’s not enough that gun-banners want to roll back the Second Amendment until it’s a meaningless shell of the constitutional protection it was meant to be. Now some even want to tell us what we shouldn’t name our children and what kind of stickers not to put on our vehicles.

I didn’t name any of my four children Hunter or Gunner, so I guess perhaps the Mirror won’t see me as a “violent” person—that is, unless they happen to catch a glimpse of the NRA Life member sticker proudly displayed on the rear window of my pick-up truck.