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Wednesday, November 2, 2016

South Carolina Woman Shoots Son To Save Daughter-In-Law

Venson Jones told his mother in late October that he was going to use a hammer to kill his estranged wife, Wanda Badger, who was also the mother of his four children. Bettie Newton knew her son was capable of the act, as Jones had just been released from federal prison.

The next day Jones asked his mother for a hammer, but she refused. However, Newton’s husband—who was unaware of the threats—gave Jones the tool. A short time later, Badger was sitting in her car when Jones attacked, striking her in the head. Newton, who lives nearby, saw the incident and went for her gun. 

As she approached her son he turned and charged, leaving her no choice but to fire. Jones, who sustained wounds to his abdomen, was transported to the hospital, as was Badger, who received treatment for several defensive wounds. Barnwell police said Newton will not be charged, as she acted in self-defense.


CNN Op-Ed Touts All The Same Failed Anti-Gun Proposals

On Monday, CNN cast off any remaining vestiges of impartiality (and any reputation for fact-checking) when it published a patently ridiculous op-ed by Philip Alpers, founding director of GunPolicy.org. 

The red flags showed themselves almost immediately: “Since 1934, U.S. federal law has mandated licensing and registration for machine guns, sawed-off shotguns and rifles.” Really? When was the last time you remember registering a rifle? 

Alpers then goes on to parrot the anti-gun talking point regarding a ban on gun-violence research. Again, no. 

But the real kicker here comes at the end, where Alpers claims that “countless lives” can be saved by implementing a “range of long-term public health initiatives”—all four of which have been tried with little to no success. 

We’ve discussed the problems with so-called “universal” background checks at length, and even proponents admit they won’t affect criminals. Micro-stamping has been abandoned as an expensive failure just about everywhere it’s been tried, and the list of crimes it’s helped solve is … well … nonexistent. Smart guns “that only the owner can fire” can, in fact, be fired by anyone unless paired with expensive companion technology, and there’s yet to be a single example of one that is even marginally reliable. As far as licensing and registration … well, how can he suggest they’ve been proven to work, when they’re ignored by criminals, and in many cases, the law-abiding?


Bud Light Pulls Anti-Gun “Comedian” Schumer’s Ad As Sales Drop

“The Bud Light Party” quickly fizzled. Amid disappointing sales and negative feedback, Anheuser-Busch canned its political parody ad campaign featuring Amy Schumer and Seth Rogan. The “Equal Pay” spot generated so much criticism online that comments had to be disabled. The ads were initially planned to run through Election Day. 

This is just the latest in a string of failures for Schumer. A cousin to New York Sen. Chuck Schumer, Amy Schumer is equally outspoken when pushing her gun-control agenda. During a show last month, the “comedian” couldn’t help but turn her act into a Trump-bashing rally—a move that left attendees booing and led to hundreds walking out in disgust. A recent Beyoncé parody also failed miserably—Schumer was accused of racism, among other things. 

I think we can all agree that Schumer’s 15 minutes of fame have long passed. Her political brand of comedy is not a winning campaign, as Anheuser-Busch learned the hard way.


Virginia: Voluntary Background Checks Not Widely Wanted, Private Sales Not A Problem

Data from the Virginia Firearms Transaction Center show that the state’s system for voluntary background checks for private firearm transactions is not widely used—contradicting claims by the anti-gun lobby that 90 percent of people want such checks. Additionally, voluntary checks have not resulted in a single denial to a prohibited person, suggesting the system is a waste of resources, the Richmond Times-Dispatch reports.

Since Virginia’s voluntary background check law took effect in July, only 21 private sellers at gun shows opted to perform background checks on purchasers. Not one check resulted in the denial of a purchase, whereas among licensed dealers—who are required by federal law to perform background checks—the denial rate was less than 1 percent.

These figures are consistent with a 1997 federal Justice Department study that found that, contrary to the claim that gun shows are a significant source of criminals’ firearms, less than 2 percent of criminals obtain their firearms through gun shows.


South Dakota Sees Increase In Women Hunters

We’ve detailed the rise in gun ownership among American women, with self-defense playing a major role in the increase. But it’s important to note that the expansion in the number of women hunters is also contributing to the boom.

Now, reports out of South Dakota detail this cultural shift in the area of upland game hunting. The number of women buying pheasant hunting licenses has nearly doubled in the last 10 years—a larger increase than in any other demographic. In fact, in 2015, one of every 10 hunting licenses—including out-of-state licenses—was purchased by women.

“In my generation, women stayed in the kitchen; men did the hunting,” Maggie Lindsey, education services coordinator with South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks, told the Sioux City Journal. “Now it's way more acceptable for women to go out and hunt. The fathers or whoever is doing the hunting in the family aren't just taking their sons; they're taking their daughters.”


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