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Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Uneven Odds: Man Fires Back On Five Home Invaders

Eighteen-year-old Diego Vallejo and four other men went to a home in Las Cruces, N.M., with the intent of breaking in and stealing property. They were armed and prepared—Vallejo had a hatchet in hand and another brandished a bayonet-style knife. 

They invaded the home and attacked a 37-year-old man living inside. He was stabbed multiple times before he was able to grab his handgun—with that, he fired and one bullet struck Vallejo in the leg. Two of the invaders tried to help Vallejo escape before giving up and leaving him in the driveway; the four then fled in a gray vehicle.

Vallejo was taken to a hospital for treatment. He’s since been charged with one count each of aggravated burglary, aggravated battery with a deadly weapon, conspiracy and criminal damage to property. Vallejo is now out on bail as the police continue their search for the rest of the suspects.

In Ballot Initiatives, Gun Owners And Hunters Lose Two ... And Win Three

After the votes were counted on Tuesday’s ballot initiatives concerning the right to keep and bear arms and the freedom to hunt, gun owners and hunters lost in two states, but prevailed in three. 

In Maine, Question 3, which would have criminalized perfectly innocent acts such as lending someone a firearm to hunt with, was soundly rejected by voters in spite of—or perhaps partly because of—millions of dollars in backing from gun-ban zealot Michael Bloomberg. Indeed, in Nevada, a similar initiative—Question 1, which also had millions of dollars in Bloomberg backing—squeaked through by a margin of less than half of 1 percent of the vote. In California, Proposition 63—more gun control which was opposed by law enforcement groups across the state—was also passed by voters. 

To the good, voters in both Indiana and Kansas adopted constitutional provisions protecting the right to hunt and fish. Thanks to voters like you, 21 states now guarantee the right to hunt in their state constitutions.


Media Blames Hillary’s Defeat On Everything But Gun Control

When the polls closed last night, it was clear that Donald J. Trump had defied a biased national media, megalomaniacal billionaires, third-party challengers, self-righteous celebrities and even recalcitrant members of his own party to defeat Democrat Hillary Clinton. 

Commentators and pundits (the majority of whom donated to Hillary) groped for an explanation: They faulted non-college-educated white males and blamed hate, anger, racism, fascism and/or xenophobia. However, none mentioned that Hillary had been the first major party candidate in recent memory to run on gun control. 

Only NBC’s Chuck Todd gave the National Rifle Association any credit for Trump’s performance: “Donald Trump didn’t get a lot of help from major Republican institutions, but he did from the NRA and they came through big. This is a big night for the NRA … they just bought a Supreme Court seat.” 

To the 5 million members of the NRA, thank you for striking a stunning, lasting blow for freedom.


Pro-Gun Lawmakers Keep Senate, House Majorities

In a night that saw Republican Donald Trump shock Hillary Clinton in a hotly contested battle for the White House, American voters further shunned gun-control advocates by voting to maintain a pro-gun majority in both the U.S. Senate and U.S. House of Representatives. 

Several NRA-backed candidates were victorious in the U.S. Senate race, sealing a razor-thin pro-gun majority there. Key victories were won by Sen. Richard Burr in North Carolina, Todd Young in Indiana, Sen. Marco Rubio in Florida, Sen. Rob Portman in Ohio, Sen. Ron Johnson in Wisconsin, Sen. Pat Toomey in Pennsylvania and Sen. Roy Blunt in Missouri. 

Pro-gun candidates also had a great showing in the U.S. House of Representatives, ensuring a pro-gun majority in that chamber. Needing 218 votes to keep that majority, Republicans held 234 seats at the time of this writing.


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