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Thursday, December 8, 2016

Alabama Homeowner Shoots Hooded Attacker

When sheriff’s deputies responded to a report of a man with a gun on a rural Alabama road, they quickly located both the man and his female accomplice—both of whom were tending to the man’s serious gunshot wound. 

According to local media reports, investigators discovered the man and woman had knocked on the door of a rural McCalla home earlier in the day. They were both wearing hoodies and neither would identify themselves to the homeowner inside, so the homeowner grabbed his gun and told the suspects he was armed.

When the homeowner looked out again, he saw one person running away and opened the door, only to find the male crouched down in the entryway. When the man continued to advance, the homeowner fired a shot and struck the suspect, who fled on foot to find his accomplice. In a strange twist, detectives later learned one of the suspects is the niece of the homeowner.


Ohio State President Thinks 11 Wounded Students Is Preferable To Campus Carry

Ohio State University President Michael Drake recently referenced the campus-carry bill currently moving through the Ohio legislature, saying “myself nor none of my colleagues think that’s a good idea, of course.” Drake claimed the car-and-knife attacker “was neutralized by a professional within one minute, and that would be how we think things should go.” He mentioned another campus incident where “the threat was neutralized within one minute and injuries were kept to a minimum, and we think that’s how things are designed to work.”

Drake is wrong on two points. First, his implication that campus security’s response time is one minute is absurd; typical response times to 911 calls nationwide are between nine and 11 minutes. 

Second, a lot can happen in one minute: 11 students were injured badly enough to send them to the hospital. Barring 15 million legal permit holders, who have a remarkable safety record, is not “how things should go.” In fact, Drake is actually enabling such attacks. 

Eleven wounded students is not acceptable in pursuit of a political agenda.


Chicago: Shoplifters Spend More Time Behind Bars Than Gun Offenders

At a conference hosted by the City Club of Chicago on Tuesday, Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson and Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart addressed the high level of violence in the Windy City. 

Johnson put the blame on repeat gun offenders and echoed his previous call for tougher sentencing, as opposed to the slap on the wrist they’re currently receiving. "Last year, of all the homicide offenders we arrested, 40 percent of them—almost half—had prior gun convictions. So what does that tell us?” he asked. "It's the same guys that choose that lifestyle." 

Sheriff Dart noted that violent offenders arrested on gun charges are six times more likely to post bond than shoplifters. “The wrong people are being released," he pointed out. His plan is to reform the bail bonds system to detain anyone deemed dangerous to society, while nonviolent criminals would go free and be given access to pre-trial services such as anger management classes or drug addiction programs.


Myrtle Beach, S.C., Quietly Tries To Resurrect Shooting Ban Proposal

The Horry County (S.C.) Council is reconsidering a proposal that would ban the discharge of firearms on private property in much of the county—a ban that was killed in 2012 under overwhelming public opposition, myrtlebeachonline.com reports. The proposal was dusted off and offered to county councilmen by Horry County Attorney Arrigo Carotti after some residents complained that guns are being fired too close to their homes. 

The proposal defeated four years ago would have banned the discharge of any firearm or bow less than 1,200 feet from any park, public building or school, or 900 feet from any business or dwelling. 

When local residents asked to see the new proposal, the county attorney refused to release it, with Horry County spokeswoman Lisa Bourcier claiming “attorney-client privilege.” Bill Rogers, executive director of the South Carolina Press Association, scoffed at that claim, noting, “It’s a public document, and the public should be able to see it.” Otherwise, he said, “The public might think they are trying to pull a fast one.”


Anti-Range Legislation Pulled From New Jersey Committee Agenda

Thanks to your calls and emails, two anti-gun range measures were removed from the New Jersey Assembly Law & Public Safety Committee’s agenda for next week. 

The bills are A.4179 and A.4180, both sponsored by Assemblyman Ralph Caputo. As written, these measures require target shooters to produce a state issued ID along with an FID card or a purchase permit before using a range.

While A.4179 and A.4180 might have been removed from Monday's agenda, these bills are by no means dead. Opposition from gun owners has resulted in the bills being held for further discussion. NRA’s Institute for Legislative Action will continue to follow the situation.

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