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Friday, February 19, 2016

UT President Insists On Empty-Chamber Carry

University of Texas President Gregory Fenves is continuing his fight against the campus-carry law passed by the Texas legislature last year, stipulating in a new policy that those carrying concealed semi-auto pistols must do so with the chamber empty. 

Obviously, carrying a firearm without a round in the chamber dramatically slows the use of that firearm in a self-defense situation. In such an instance, the gun would have to be drawn and the slide cycled to chamber a round before any shot could be fired. If dramatically slowing and complicating a normal defense isn’t bad enough, consider a gun owner who happened to find himself with the use of only one hand. Timely deployment now becomes laughably doubtful—and likely unmasks Fenves’ actual goal from the outset: just take your beating, robbery or worse. The president’s office will be sympathetic after the fact. 

Other provisions of the new policy include a ban on open carry, and retaining some gun-free zones on campus such as in dorms, medical facilities, labs and ticketed sporting events. 


Houston Rodeo Steers Clear Of Firearms

The Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo said on Tuesday that it would prohibit both the concealed and open carry of handguns by private citizens during the 2016 season. Despite Texas law that allows for both, event executives are again denying attendees their Second Amendment right to bear arms. In 2015, the rodeo began prohibiting concealed carry. 

Joel Cowley, president and chief executive officer of the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo, felt some people were concerned the event would allow open carry and were waiting for the rodeo to clarify its position before they would purchase tickets. 

In announcing the policy, Crowley said, “It’s our goal to promote a family-friendly atmosphere. We don’t think the private carry of handguns is conducive to that.” 

Instead, they’re creating a gun-free zone that will make the event much more conducive to criminals and attackers … people who could certainly detract from a “family-friendly” atmosphere.


Michigan Approves Hunting With Suppressors, Joining 37 Other States

In a major victory for lawful sportsmen and women, Michigan became the 38th state to allow hunting with suppressors after its Natural Resources Commission last week approved their use in the field. Noting that many hunters do not wear hearing protection because they don’t want to limit their ability to hear game, commissioners approved lifting the longtime ban by a vote of 4-to-1, with two commissioners absent. 

Previous versions of the proposed rule limited the effectiveness of suppressors and banned subsonic ammunition, but after other states’ fish and game authorities reported finding no significant problems after lifting their bans on suppressors for hunting, Michigan did the same, repealing the ban entirely.

Today, 41 states allow lawful citizens to possess suppressors. Over the past five years, 16 states have legalized them for hunting, and 13 states have passed laws making it easier for lawful citizens to own them.


Leland Yee Facing Eight Years In Federal Prison

He was well-known for being a hawk on guns. Now corrupt former California state Sen. Leland Yee will simply be known as a jailbird.

The Democrat from San Francisco was arrested two years ago as part of a federal investigation into an organized crime ring run by Raymond “Shrimp Boy” Chow. With charges ranging from drug distribution, money laundering and a plan to smuggle guns into the U.S. through Islamic terror groups, Yee faced life in prison. But an agreement allowed his legal team to enter a guilty plea for only a single felony count of racketeering.

Now, U.S. Attorney Brian Stretch is recommending a sentence of eight years in jail and three years supervised release, plus a fine of $25,000. Stretch wrote, “Yee demonstrated he was a public servant who was willing to betray the trust of those who elected him by being prepared to sell his vote to the highest bidder.”

Judge Charles Breyer will rule on Yee’s formal sentencing later this month.


CA Gun Owners Continue Waiting Period Battle

Despite a ruling back in 2014 that the state’s longstanding 10-day waiting period for the purchase of firearms was unconstitutional, California gun owners are still fighting the onerous process.

Attorney General Kamala Harris has kept wait requirements in place while the state appeals the ruling. At odds in a case now being heard in the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco is why gun owners who have already passed a background check—proving they are no threat to safety and legally eligible to make the purchase—must endure the 10-day wait before picking up their firearm.

According to the plaintiffs in the case, Californians who have passed background checks and who have been issued a state Certificate of Eligibility or a California License to Carry are being deprived of their Second and Fourteenth Amendment rights in being made to wait for each new purchase.


N.C. Senior Citizen Fights Off Home Intruder

A disabled 71-year-old Hickory, N.C., man was watching television in his home Monday when he heard a knock at the door. Since it was late, he decided not to answer it. But about 15 minutes later, an intruder smashed through the sliding glass door in the rear of the home. 

The resident, Tony Pitts, retrieved a .22-caliber pistol and responded to the threat by firing at the criminal, striking him twice.

Pitts said that this is not the first time his home has been broken into and that he shot the man because he was afraid. “I’m disabled and somebody kicks the door in, I got to do something,” Pitts told WSOC-TV. “I didn’t want to but had to. If I hadn’t shot him, he might have shot me. I don’t know.” Despite the gunshot wounds, the intruder fled the scene to a nearby club and asked for help. He is expected to survive.


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