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Thursday, June 2, 2016

Harvey Lembo Appeals Case To Maine Supreme Court

Harvey Lembo, the disabled 68-year-old whose home was burglarized six times and who bought a gun to protect himself—only to be threatened with eviction if he kept his gun—has appealed to Maine’s highest court in his lawsuit seeking relief, under the Maine Civil Rights Act, from his landlord. 

As we’ve detailed here and here, the day after Lembo bought his gun, when his home was invaded yet again, he shot and wounded the intruder. Police confiscated Lembo’s firearm as evidence in their case against the burglar, and Lembo’s landlord demanded he get rid of the gun—or get out of the apartment. 

Although Maine passed legislation protecting tenants like Lembo from being disarmed, a judge dismissed his lawsuit against the landlord that denied his Second Amendment rights. Now Lembo is appealing to the Maine Supreme Judicial Court. No one should go through the injustice Lembo has faced. We wish him well.


HBO, Like Couric, Accused Of Deceptively Editing Interview

Jim Sullivan, one of the designers of the AR-15, the Ruger Mini-14 and other popular firearms, has accused HBO of deceptively editing his interview in an unconscionably biased episode of “Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel” titled, “AR15: Modern Sporting Rifle.” 

Sullivan wrote to The Federalist, “The anti-gun HBO sports interview misrepresented much of what I had said. They were apparently trying to make the AR-15 civilian model seem too dangerous for civilian sales. They didn’t lie about what I said; they just omitted key parts which changed the meaning.” 

Sullivan wrote that HBO “omitted that I had said ‘when firing semi-auto only and that the select fire M16 on full auto is of course more effective,’” when comparing the lethality of the AR-15 to the military M-16. About appearing to imply the AR-15 was never meant for civilian use, Sullivan wrote, “That doesn’t mean I’m not pleased to see AR-15s sell on the civilian market. It just means I didn’t realize they would 57 years ago.”


The NYT, The NFA And The NRA

The New York Times recently ran an op-ed by Alan Berlow claiming that because the National Firearms Act (NFA) has both worked and stood the test of time, it should be expanded to include registering, fingerprinting and photographing of every gun owner—and that claims that reasonable limits on gun ownership are a serious burden to law-abiding gun owners are “nonsensical.” 

But are they? 1934’s NFA (and subsequent amendments) have resulted in sky-high prices for NFA firearms and accessories, months-long wait times, and an open door to further gun control—all plenty burdensome. But contrary to Berlow’s claims, NRA has been fighting against NFA restrictions—as the march of suppressor legalization proves. 

Berlow also admits that while the number of registered NFA owners who commit crimes is infinitesimally small, “NFA-classified weapons do show up at crime scenes, but nearly all of them are unregistered.” What’s that you say? Only the law-abiding will obey laws mandating registration, while criminals will ignore them? If criminals still manage to obtain firearms that were not only available in small numbers to begin with, but have also been illegal for 30 years, how effective is it really?


Sacramento County Sees Concealed-Carry Permits Rise By Thousands

When elected Sacramento County sheriff in 2011, Scott Jones had one campaign pledge he intended to keep—to make sure every law-abiding citizen received a concealed handgun permit if filed. And over the past five years, the number of permits has risen from 350 to almost 8,000—placing his county behind only Fresno and Orange for the number of concealed-carry permits in the state. 

However, that doesn’t sit well with some in the media. In a recent Sacramento Bee op-ed, the newspaper’s editorial board whined about tax money funding part of the permit process, before finally getting to what they really wanted to say: “We do not feel safer now that one in every 135 Sacramento County residents has a concealed-carry permit. And we certainly don’t believe taxpayers should pay for the gun owners’ privilege.” 

For his part, Sheriff Jones doesn’t really seem to care what the editorial board thinks. Jones recently told the board in an email that issuing permits “is not a business enterprise,” and that when the department tried to make the operation cost-neutral, the “delays and backup were untenable.”


Armed Oregon Man Fights Off Intruder During Break-In

In an episode relived over and over several times daily throughout the nation—and that anti-gun politicians and the media claim seldom happens—an apartment resident in Salem, Ore., used his legally owned firearm on Tuesday to stop a man who had broken into his apartment.

According to local media reports, the armed man forced his way into the apartment at about 4:25 a.m. on Tuesday. One of the apartment’s occupants retrieved his gun and fired at the suspect, causing the intruder to flee. 

Police are uncertain if the suspect, who they are still looking for, was wounded in the home-defense shooting.


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