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Wednesday, July 20, 2016

NRA Grant Assists Youth Rifle Program

The competitive rifle program at East Stroudsburg South High School in Pennsylvania—which offers teams for grades 7-12—is one of the most successful in the state, and has taken the Northeast Pennsylvania Rifle League title for the past two seasons. Coach Jay Armitage gives much of the credit to the NRA Foundation.

The foundation has offered numerous grants to the Cavaliers over the years, and the most recent for $5,000 helped provide for materials that included three .22 caliber bolt-action Anschutz target rifles and three cases of Winchester .22 ammunition. Rising ammunition costs over the past five years, combined with a school budget that has remained constant, has made the NRA Foundation’s support even more critical. 

“Number one, it allows more students to participate,” said Armitage. “It keeps our equipment up to date, and our league is becoming more competitive every year.”


NYDN: Gun Control Wouldn’t Have Prevented Police Murders, But Ban Guns Anyway

After admitting that gun control laws wouldn’t have stopped the Dallas and Baton Rouge police assassins, New York Daily News writer Shaun King nonetheless went on to pronounce, “A ban and complete eradication of assault rifles from the hands of everyday citizens is a reasonable reform.”

“No type of background check would've stopped these men,” King wrote. “Requiring gun training of all who purchase weapons would've been an easy hurdle for each of them. A waiting period wouldn't have been a problem. They didn't need a loophole to purchase their weapons.” Nevertheless: Ban guns.

King’s words are worth noting. First, because they show how emotion can confuse clear thinking: A ban on firearms used in less than 3 percent of all murders isn’t likely to have any measurable effect on crime. And second, because they give lie to anti-gunners’ perennial claim that, “No one wants to take your guns away.”


Gander Mountain To Partner With NRA

Gander Mountain, a Minneapolis-based outdoor retailer, announced on Monday that it has entered into a partnership with the National Rifle Association to offer customers the opportunity to join the NRA at a discounted price.

The pilot program began this week in stores in Minnesota, Wisconsin and North Dakota, with a September launch planned for all 163 stores nationwide.

“We are proud to support the shooting sports industry through our partnership with the NRA and are committed to providing responsible citizens with access to firearms and educational programs that promote proper use, care, safety and security through our ongoing ‘With Rights Comes Responsibility’ campaign,” said Gander Mountain President Derek Siddons. “The right to own and use firearms comes with a responsibility to be educated and safe. With safety being our number-one priority with firearms, we're proud to have provided over 250,000 training sessions to our customers through our six Gander Mountain Academy locations since its founding in 2011.”


Florida Nightclub Attack Spurs Run On Carry Permits

A report in Tuesday’s Orlando Sentinel reveals that applications for Florida concealed-carry permits have skyrocketed since the terrorist attack on an Orlando nightclub in early June.

According to the Sentinel, “In May, the Florida Department of Agriculture distributed more than 20,000 applications to people interested in a concealed weapon permit or other firearm license. That number jumped to more than 36,000 in June, according to recently released numbers.”

The number of permit applications distributed nearly doubling in a month is a good indication that many law-abiding Floridians aren’t buying the bill of goods being sold by anti-gun politicians that the best way to stop such attacks in the future is to pass more restrictive gun laws that will only be obeyed by law-abiding citizens.


Professors Sue University of Texas For Right to Ban Guns in Class

Texas campus carry is set to go into effect on Aug. 1. On that day, gun owners with concealed-carry licenses will be able to carry handguns on college campuses—including campus buildings, classrooms and dorms.

Three anti-gun professors at the University of Texas in Austin, however, have filed a lawsuit in the hopes of blocking that law. Mia Carter, Jennifer Lynn Glass and Lisa Moore call the measure an “overly solicitous, dangerously experimental” law. 

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton reacted swiftly and sternly in decrying the lawsuit. “This lawsuit is not only baseless, it is an insult to the millions of law-abiding gun owners in Texas and across this country,” read a statement posted on the AG’s website. “The right to keep and bear arms is guaranteed for all Americans, including college students, and must be vigilantly protected and preserved.”


Mini Mart Employee Stops Robbery—With His Handgun

An employee at a Lumberton, N.C., convenience store came face to face with death last Friday night. Luckily a coworker was on the job—and armed.

According to local media reports, Franklin McLaurin walked into the store at 11 p.m. and pointed his gun at the clerk’s head. However, another employee surprised the would-be robber, drawing and firing his own firearm and sending the criminal running out the door. A police dog and sheriff’s deputies later found Franklin hiding in bushes only a few blocks from the store.

Emergency responders took McLaurin to New Hanover Regional Medical Center with life-threatening injuries and, according to a Lumberton Police Department statement, charges will be filed once he recovers. The same A&B Mini Mart was robbed on June 16, when another man walked in, showed the clerk his handgun and stole an undisclosed amount of money. Police continue their search for that robbery suspect. 


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