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Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Gun Owners Roll To Protest Massachusetts Ban Expansion

About 150 law-abiding Massachusetts gun owners took their protest of Attorney General Maura Healey’s unilateral addition of hundreds of formerly legal rifles to the banned list on the road last weekend.

According to the Boston Herald, the participants loaded cars, trucks and motorcycles and had a 55-mile rolling rally, traveling from Minute Man Sportsman’s Club in Burlington to the Hanson Rod and Gun Club, carrying signs such as “Tyranny—It’s Back.”

As we have covered in detail, in late July Healey issued a so-called “enforcement notice” to firearm dealers in the Bay State in which she unilaterally announced that, effective immediately, sales of semi-automatic rifles that were perfectly legal in the state one day would be illegal the next. In other words, Healey simply redefined the law—at whim and at will by executive fiat—to mean whatever she says it means.


Poll: Majority Of Americans Believe Guns Increase Safety And Rights Should Be Protected

A study by Pew Research Center found a majority of Americans believe it’s more important to protect gun rights than to institute more gun-control laws. Results of the survey show 52 percent of Americans believe it’s more important to protect gun rights, while 46 percent said it’s more important to control gun ownership.

The study also found that how you answered that question largely depended on who you planned to vote for in the upcoming presidential election. Among Donald Trump voters, 90 percent favored protecting gun rights, while only 19 percent of Hillary Clinton supporters felt the same. This nearly 70-point difference between Democratic supporters and Republican supporters on this issue is the largest in more than a decade—in May 2000, the gap was only 19 percent. 

A majority of Americans—58 percent—also believed gun ownership protects safety rather than increasing risk, although sharp party divides could be seen here, too.


Chicago’s Top Cop Reiterates Intent To Put Away Repeat Offenders

Just last week we reported on the efforts of Chicago police to combat the city’s deadly violence with real action—putting offenders behind bars. Now, with Chicago back in the news following the murder of NBA player Dwyane Wade’s cousin, Nykea Aldridge, Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson is doubling down on his promise to clamp down on criminals. 

Johnson addressed the broken criminal justice system at a press conference Sunday. “Darwin Sorrells was let out on parole for unlawful use of a weapon in February. His brother, Derren Sorrells, was involved in a murder not only while he was on parole, but while he was wearing a home monitoring bracelet,” Johnson said, referring to the men—known gang members—who killed Aldridge. 

“It’s time to stop talking and to get serious and take action when it comes to how we sentence our repeat gun offenders,” Chicago’s top cop declared. “I’m frustrated, you should be frustrated, all Chicagoans should be frustrated.”


16 States Back Lawsuit Against D.C.’s Prejudicial Right-To-Carry Permit System

The attorneys general of 16 states have joined together in filing a “friend of the court” brief in a lawsuit arguing that Washington, D.C.’s concealed-carry permit system—which requires applicants to show “good reason” to be issued a permit—is unconstitutional. 

As the brief points out, 42 states currently have either unrestricted or “shall-issue” Right-to-Carry systems and, as Arizona Assistant Solicitor General Keith Miller put it, “over half the population has lived in states where non-discriminatory licensed carry laws are norm.”

The suit arose after D.C. authorities denied a carry permit to Matthew Grace because he didn’t “demonstrate a proper reason” to be issued a permit—despite the fact that Grace’s wife had been robbed on the street and despite Utah and Virginia having already issued permits to Grace. In May, a federal judge issued a preliminary injunction rejecting that standard, and now oral arguments in the appeal of that case—Grace v. District of Columbia—are scheduled for Sept. 20.


Mom, Sons Fight Off Intruder With Sword, Buy A Gun The Next Day

When single mother Sara Ward and her two sons heard their dog barking at the front door of their Battle Creek, Mich., home, they never expected what came next.

As Sara went to the door, 11-year-old Reese grabbed his samurai sword and leaned it nearby just in case. That turned out to be a good decision, as a man with a bandana covering his face kicked in the door and entered the home. As Sara and Reese tried to push the man back outside, 14-year-old Skyler, who was getting out of the shower, heard the melee, grabbed the sword and ran at the man, swinging the sword and sending him fleeing.

Realizing how lucky they were to escape the home invasion unscathed, Sara went out the next day and bought a gun. “Honestly that’s the only reason I felt safe coming back to this home is because I knew that if it happened again I would be able to protect my children,” she told local media. “I think that that really contributed to them feeling safe enough to come back home, too.”


Robbers Fall Through Store Ceiling—And Into Crossfire

A Discount Check Cashing store in south Macon, Ga., had a couple of unexpected visitors drop by Saturday morning. That’s when two men trying to rob the store fell through the ceiling—and into an exchange of gunfire.

The Bibb County Sheriff’s Office is reporting that an employee heard noises in the ceiling, and the two men fell through the roof when the manager investigated. As one of the suspects robbed the business, another man in the store traded gunfire with the other robber. One suspect, Rarrekcus Delbridge, 22, was taken to a local medical center after being shot in the leg. He was charged with aggravated assault and criminal attempt to commit armed robbery.

The second suspect escaped, and it was not known if he was hit by gunfire.


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