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Friday, September 2, 2016

Don’t Take A Crochet Hook To A Gun Fight

When a man armed with a crochet hook tried to break into a Mountlake Terrace, Wash., home through a window, he got a rude awakening from a better-armed homeowner.

The intruder, who was dressed in black and had a female accomplice, barely made it through the window before he was shot by the occupant of the home. When police arrived, the wounded man was unresponsive and lying in the street. 

Police later caught the accomplice in a car the two had stolen earlier. The man remains hospitalized in critical condition.


Gunpowder Scare Averted—For Now

NRA’s Institute for Legislative Action is reporting that the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) has at least temporarily backed off a ruling that would have changed the way one of the main components of smokeless gunpowder used in modern ammunition is treated.

Earlier this summer, ATF released an Explosives Industry Newsletter that changed the agency’s treatment of nitrocellulose. This change had the potential to seriously disrupt ammunition supply in the United States because it changed a long-standing ATF policy that exempted properly “wetted” nitrocellulose from treatment as an explosive under federal law.

NRA and industry raised these concerns to ATF and any change in ATF’s treatment of nitrocellulose is now officially delayed. In an addendum to the earlier newsletter, ATF announced that it “will conduct further industry outreach concerning wetted nitrocellulose. In the interim, previously authorized industry practices concerning wetted nitrocellulose will not be affected.”


Virginia Tech Survivor Backs Texas Campus Carry

At a CBS Austin debate on Texas’ campus carry laws Monday, panel member Nicholas Roland stood out: He was the only panelist to have survived a campus mass shooting. 

Roland, now a U.S. history PhD candidate at the University of Texas, was a senior at Virginia Tech when the 2007 massacre occurred. Noting a cultural bias in favor of anti-carry partisans, thecollegefix.com reported that Roland said the “worse situation is to have no defense back” in a mass shooting. “The police were not fast enough and 32 people died” because no one else was armed and able to confront the attacker, he said. 

Roland, who also served in the U.S. military, went on to note the success of campus carry at universities in Utah and Colorado, where it has been legal for more than a decade.


South Dakota School District Now Has Armed Staffer

Colton, S.D., is a small community that sits 25 miles northwest of Sioux Falls. Due to its remote location, should a crisis arise, help would not come quickly.

That’s the reason the Tri-Valley School District has moved ahead with a program that authorizes approved employees to carry guns. So far, one applicant has been approved and has met the training requirements. 

In March 2013, South Dakota lawmakers passed a law allowing for the option of arming teachers and administrators. But it was an incident at another school that spurred Tri-Valley’s decision. At that high school, a student was charged with attempted murder after he shot and wounded the principal. The teenager was eventually tackled and held down until the police arrived. 

Tri-Valley School District Superintendent Mike Lodmel estimates that at least 50 parents or community members have expressed their strong support for the program.


12-Year-Old Hunter Brushes Off Death Wishes Leveled Against Her

After bearing the brunt of online bullying and death wishes two weeks ago after posting a photo of herself standing with a giraffe she’d shot in South Africa, 12-year-old big-game hunter Aryanna Gourdin this week said, “I’m never going to stop [hunting],” and “I would never back down from hunting,” according to a story in London’s Mirror

As Breitbart has reported, after Gourdin posted photos of her latest hunt on Facebook, she became a target for social media outrage and hatred, with one activist posting, “When somebody shoots you I hope I can post the same picture on my Facebook, with your head in my hand ...” 

But as the young huntress pointed out in an Aug. 19 appearance on “Fox & Friends,” the meat from that giraffe was enough to feed a village. Furthermore, she asked, “How could you value an animal’s life over a human’s?”


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