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Thursday, January 5, 2017

Kentucky “Permitless” Carry Bill Needs Your Support

On Tuesday, the first day of the Kentucky statehouse’s 2017 session, legislation was introduced to make the Bluegrass State the twelfth state in the nation to allow lawful residents to carry concealed firearms without a permit. Senate Bill 7 would allow any law-abiding individual who can legally possess a firearm to carry a handgun for self-defense in Kentucky without having to obtain a permit to do so. 

So far Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Idaho, Kansas, Maine, Mississippi, Missouri, Vermont, West Virginia and Wyoming have similar laws—a policy commonly called “Constitutional Carry” because it expressly affirms the Second Amendment’s right to keep and bear arms.


Use Your Power!

Kentucky residents, please contact your state senator and politely urge him or her to vote YES on Senate Bill 7 when it comes up for a vote. To contact your senator, click here.

Schumer Can't Imagine A "Mainstream" Trump Supreme Court Nominee

On Tuesday, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said, “It’s hard for me to imagine a nominee that Donald Trump would choose that would get Republican support that we could support.”  

Schumer told MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow that he is prepared to block any Trump nominee to the Supreme Court whom he does not consider “mainstream,” and that he would “absolutely” do his best to hold the seat open. 

Reminded by CNN that Democrats changed long-standing Senate rules to get Obama’s judicial nominees approved, Schumer expressed regret (“Wish it hadn’t happened”)—while warning that it would be “very hard” for Republicans to do the same thing for Supreme Court nominees.  

Declaring opposition to any Trump nominee while decrying possible rules changes just shows that, when the shoe is on the other foot, Schumer’s blatant hypocrisy sticks out.

RTC Reciprocity Bill Introduced In U.S. Congress

National Right-to-Carry reciprocity is now officially on the table. Rep. Richard Hudson, R-N.C., introduced the legislation on Tuesday, Congress’ first day in session for 2017. 

The Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act of 2017 would enable law-abiding citizens with a concealed-carry permit to travel to any other state that allows concealed carry. It would also allow residents of “permitless” carry states to carry in other states that recognize their own resident’s right to concealed carry. 

“Our Second Amendment right doesn’t disappear when we cross state lines, and this legislation guarantees that,” said Hudson. He called it a “common-sense solution” to a problem too many Americans face, and noted that it would enable gun owners to travel freely between states without worrying about conflicting state codes.

Democrats have vowed to fight the legislation, however. Such a bill would be “dead on arrival” in the upper chamber, promised Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn.

Nevada Background Check Law Runs Into More Problems

We’ve reported recently how the Nevada attorney general declared the state’s new “universal” background check law to be unenforceable, and how Nevada sheriffs have publicly stated they won’t enforce the law.

Now the law has run into another roadblock. According to a report in the Las Vegas Review-Journal, a new lawsuit filed by a private gun seller argues that it improperly creates a “taxable event” for gun sellers in violation of the state Constitution. The lawsuit claims that would violate the sellers’ right to due process in the event they did not have the checks conducted.

According to the complaint, a retailer performing a background check for a private gun sale or transfer would have to take possession of the firearm as if it was part of the store’s inventory and then charge the seller a sales or use tax. The Review-Journal reported that Las Vegas attorney Donald Green, who filed the lawsuit on behalf of a client who occasionally sells guns at gun shows, said that would place a financial burden on the seller.

Man Shoots Charging Pit Bull In Self-Defense

Imagine that you’re walking to your car on your own property and encounter two pit bulls. One dog begins to growl, baring its teeth. Then it charges straight for you. 

It was a real-life scenario for a Taylor, Mich., man on the last day of 2016. Luckily, he was armed with a revolver. When the man realized he couldn’t make it to the house before being mauled, he used his firearm to stop the advancing animal. Afterward, the dazed homeowner called police and a neighbor—the dog’s owner—to report the incident. 

Police determined it was a defensive action and no charges were filed, and the owner took the dog to a local vet where it recovered. Records show Animal Control officers had previously warned the pit bull owners after the dogs had escaped the yard, and witnesses to the New Year’s Eve incident say both dogs had been terrorizing the neighborhood for nearly an hour.

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