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Saturday, February 18, 2017

Suppressors Seldom Used In Crime

While anti-gun advocates opposed to the Hearing Protection Act have made every attempt to muddy the waters by claiming that silencers are used by hit men and are common in other crimes, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) just released statistics showing suppressors (called silencers by some, even though they are not silent) are used in just a tiny fraction of crimes.

According to a report in the Washington Free Beacon, there are currently about 1.3 million firearm suppressors legally owned in the United States—up about 400,000 since last year. But ATF reports that the agency has only recommended prosecutions for 44 suppressor-related crimes per year over the past decade.

Do that math, and that’s about .003 percent of suppressors used in crimes each year. In truth, the Hearing Protection Act really is designed to protect the hearing of shooters and hunters. Now those opposing the measure have lost their favorite excuse—that deregulating suppressors will increase crime.


Florida Woman Shoots Intruder Breaking Into Her Home

Mary Starling Shirley was quietly working on her computer just after 6 a.m. last Thursday morning. Suddenly, she noticed one of the windows in the room begin to open from the outside.

St. Petersburg police told Fox-13 that Shirley then saw a man—someone she didn’t know—coming through the window. Shirley warned the suspect that she was armed, but he kept coming through the window. With her clear warning and the intruder’s continued advance, she had no choice.

The suspect, 48-year-old Timothy Scott Tugman, was struck twice with shots from Shirley’s revolver. After police and EMTs arrived, Tugman was taken to a hospital where he underwent emergency surgery. The suspect is expected to survive—and expected to face occupied residential burglary charges once released from the hospital. Police told reporters Shirley was traumatized from the episode, but she took the right precautions in a serious situation.


Committee Hearing Set For Alabama “Permitless” Carry Bill

Is constitutional carry coming to Alabama? If State Sen. Gerald Allen’s Senate Bill 24 is passed, it will be. The legislation would remove the permit requirement for law-abiding citizens to carry a concealed firearm for self-defense. The bill is scheduled for a hearing in the Senate Judiciary Committee on March 1.

While many applaud legislation that would enable citizens to readily defend themselves, not everyone supports the bill. One adversary is Pickens County Sheriff David Abston. Despite his claim that, “As a sheriff, I firmly back the Second Amendment,” Abston stands in opposition to the bill for a surprising reason.

“This money generated from the pistol permit goes to buy our uniforms, equipment, our firearms, our training, our ammunition to train, and to send people to the police academy,” Abston said. “Once you take away that funding, where’s the money going to come from?”

Abston’s refusal to back “permitless” carry over concerns of loss of revenue is absurd. Potential loss of life should far outweigh budget constraints.


N.H. House Kills Anti-Gun Measures

The New Hampshire House of Representatives this week voted down two anti-gun bills that would have negatively affected law-abiding gun owners in the state.

If enacted, HB 201 would have required individuals to appear before a licensed firearm dealer to request a criminal background check prior to transferring a firearm, absent limited and vague exceptions. The firearm dealer would also have been required to create a record of each sale. And the measure’s vague definition of a “commercial sale” would have encompassed all private sales and transfers of firearms. It was voted down 221-151.

HB 350, which was voted down 204-144, would have made carrying a gun while voting a Class B felony, punishable by up to seven years in prison. Currently, individuals can lawfully carry a firearm into a polling place where it is not prohibited by law to do so.


Shall-Issue Carry Measure Introduced In California

In a state where the majority of politicians have lost all respect for the Second Amendment, one assemblywoman is fighting for the rights of law-abiding gun owners.

Assemblywoman Melissa A. Melendez has introduced AB 757, which would clarify that self-defense is an acceptable “good cause” for the purposes of obtaining a concealed-carry permit, effectively making California a shall-issue state.

“It is our constitutional right to defend ourselves,” Melendez said. “Californians should not be subjugated to the personal beliefs of one individual who doesn’t believe in the Second Amendment. If a citizen passes the background check and completes the necessary safety training requirements, there should be no reason to deny them a CCW.”

Under current law, a county sheriff or police chief has the sole discretion on the issuance of a concealed-carry weapon (CCW) permit.


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