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Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Homeowner Stops Crowbar-Wielding Intruder With Single Shot

Paper beats rock. Rock beats scissors. Gun beats crowbar. A south Pittsburgh home intruder recently learned this essential lesson the hard way. 

WPXI-TV 11 reports that officers responded to the invasion and subsequent assault at around 9 p.m. on Monday. Investigators say the 51-year-old resident heard someone digging through items on the first floor of his home, so he grabbed his firearm and headed down. Once the homeowner encountered the intruder—identified as 56-year-old Darrell Bettis—the suspect charged and struck him with a crowbar. 

A struggle ensued, which was quickly ended when the resident fired a single shot into Bettis’ upper thigh. EMT officers transported Bettis to a local hospital where he is expected to be turned over to police and charged with criminal mischief, burglary and aggravated assault. Paramedics also treated the homeowner for a head wound.


Senate Judiciary Committee Recommends Gorsuch; Dems Keep Enough Votes To Filibuster

On Monday, the Senate Judiciary Committee voted 11-9, along party lines, to recommend the confirmation of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court. 

On the same day, Senate Democrats said they had enough votes to block the nomination. Though a partisan filibuster on a Supreme Court nominee is unprecedented, Democrats are angry that Obama’s nominee, Judge Merrick Garland, was not considered by the Republican-controlled Senate. However, the U.S. Constitution gives the Senate full power over the confirmation process; had Democrats won the Senate in the midterm elections, or won the 2016 presidential election, they wouldn’t be in this predicament.

Monday’s actions set up a climactic confrontation for Thursday, when Gorsuch’s nomination is scheduled to be voted upon in the full Senate. If Democrats filibuster, Republicans have implied they would invoke the so-called “nuclear option,” changing Senate rules to require only a simple majority to break it (as Democrats did to get lower court nominees confirmed). “Let me assure you that Judge Gorsuch is going to be on the Supreme Court by midnight Friday night,” U.S. Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, told Fox News’ Martha MacCallum.


N.J. Legislators Sue Governor Over Carry Permit Rule

We told you recently how New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie tried to ease the burden on the state’s law-abiding gun owners by making a critical portion of the state’s concealed-carry law more user friendly.

Now, Philly.com reports that the New Jersey legislature is suing Christie in an attempt to roll back that rule.

Last month, Christie formally adopted the police rules introduced in 2016 that more clearly define the state's “justifiable need” standard for issuance of concealed-carry permits. Christie’s newly adopted rules allow New Jersey officials to consider evidence of “serious threats” that are not directed specifically at a person when they consider applications for handgun carry permits.

Apparently proud that their state is one of the worst for Second Amendment rights, the Democrat-led legislature wants to go back to the more restrictive standard, and is filing suit to do so—remarkably ignorant considering legislators in some 20 other states are currently considering loosening regulations pertaining to concealed carry.


South Carolina House To Vote On “Permitless” Carry

An NRA-supported “permitless,” or “constitutional,” carry bill has been scheduled for a House floor vote this week. 

H. 3930, introduced by Republican Rep. Mike Pitts, would eliminate the requirement to obtain a concealed-carry permit to legally carry a firearm. In other words, Palmetto State residents would be allowed to exercise their Second Amendment rights without needing permission from the government, and without having to pay a tax that could represent an undue hardship for some.

As in other states, under H. 3930, the current permitting system would be retained in order for South Carolina residents to take advantage of reciprocity agreements with other states. 

According to Myrtle Beach Online, while time is running out, House GOP members have made it a priority to ensure this measure comes to a vote this week. “Second Amendment rights are a cornerstone of the Constitution, and they are extremely important to many in this body,” House Majority Leader Gary Simrill said.


N.J. Legislators Sue Governor Over Carry Permit Rule

We told you recently how New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie tried to ease the burden on the state’s law-abiding gun owners by making a critical portion of the state’s concealed-carry law more user friendly.

Now, Philly.com reports that the New Jersey legislature is suing Christie in an attempt to roll back that rule.

Last month, Christie formally adopted the police rules introduced in 2016 that more clearly define the state's “justifiable need” standard for issuance of concealed-carry permits. Christie’s newly adopted rules allow New Jersey officials to consider evidence of “serious threats” that are not directed specifically at a person when they consider applications for handgun carry permits.

Apparently proud that their state is one of the worst for Second Amendment rights, the Democrat-led legislature wants to go back to the more restrictive standard, and is filing suit to do so—remarkably ignorant considering legislators in some 20 other states are currently considering loosening regulations pertaining to concealed carry.


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