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Thursday, November 19, 2015

UK Beefs Up Security For Game, Anti-Gun Journalists Cry Foul

In the wake of the Paris terrorist attacks, which included a largely unsuccessful strike against a soccer match attended by President François Hollande, British law enforcement are rolling out a newly equipped elite counter-terrorism squad. The Scotland Yard unit made an appearance at a game between England and France at Wembley Stadium. 

Of course, the United Kingdom is not known for giving the average officer on the street firepower. And the pundits at The Daily Mail seemed plenty scared by the anti-terror squad, shrilly noting the “female ‘robocops’ dressed in military fatigues” who “came out of the shadows” following the attacks. While we maintain that a lawful armed citizenry is the ultimate defense, we applaud a robust response against terror—even one that highlights just how far the UK still has to go.


New House Speaker Ryan Touts Mental Health Legislation

Rather than advocating more restrictive gun-control laws that typically only affect law-abiding citizens, new U.S. Speaker of the House Paul Ryan is pushing an NRA-backed mental health bill to help combat gun violence.

In a “60 Minutes” episode posted on the CBS website, Ryan said: “I haven’t thought of proposing gun legislation. I think the big problem we have is enforcing the law as we have on the books right now.”

Ryan then touted the legislation introduced by U.S. Rep. Tim Murphy, R-Pa. “The other issue that I think we need to take a look at, and I’m pushing this in the Commerce committee, is Congressman Murphy’s legislation on mental health. I think we need to improve our mental health laws so we can address these problems before they get out of control, because mental health is a component to a lot of these shootings that, I think, we have not looked at seriously enough.”

N.J. “Smart” Gun Mandate Moves Forward

A bill requiring New Jersey gun dealers to stock and display so-called “personalized” handguns moved to the full Senate in Trenton for consideration this week. 

The bill, S3249, was introduced last week by Democrat Senate Majority Leader Loretta Weinberg—who also authored the state’s 2002 “smart” gun law, which has languished for over a decade because no firearm currently available “can only be fired by an authorized or recognized user.” The new measure mandates that once such technology is available, wholesalers and retailers MUST offer it for sale and display it, no matter how expensive, failure-prone and unacceptable to consumers such firearms might prove to be.

Use Your Power!

New Jersey residents, defend your right to defend yourself and your family as you see fit. Contact your state senator in Trenton and urge them to vote NO on S3249 and to vote NO on its “government knows best” dictates. To find your lawmaker, click here.

European Lawmakers Target Decommissioned Firearms

It is sadly predictable that the first impulse among many policymakers in Europe after the Paris terrorist attacks is to pile on more firearm regulations instead of exploring the benefits of gun ownership among law-abiding citizens. One initial, and somewhat unusual, target of their regulatory zeal is the market for military weapons that are decommissioned and sold to collectors. According to The Wall Street Journal, some police and political sources maintain that such firearms can be restored to full functionality by skilled mechanics and supplied to criminals and terrorists. 

It seems unlikely to us that more strictly regulating the transfer of decommissioned firearms will do much to stem the tide of illegal weapons, especially when they can be acquired more easily by other means. We will continue to monitor the situation and report on any legislation that emerges.


Ohio May Dismantle Many “Gun-Free” Zones

Ohioans with concealed-carry licenses could soon carry firearms in certain public areas under House Bill 48, which passed the House Tuesday with a 68-29 vote and is now headed to the Senate for further consideration. The bill would allow concealed-carry permit holders to carry a handgun inside a daycare center and in certain public areas of airports and police stations. HB48 would also allow universities to adopt concealed-carry policies on campus and would reduce the charge of illegally carrying a handgun on campus to a misdemeanor. 

Supporters of the bill said they are eliminating “victim zones” by decreasing the number of places where guns cannot be carried in the state. The bill’s sponsor, Republican Representative Ron Maag, said HB48 addresses problems with current gun laws and ensures concealed-carry license holders can carry without “undue hardships.” “It would prevent law-abiding citizens from unintended law-breaking in many circumstances,” he said.


Armed Robber Wanted To Take Cash, Instead Took A Bullet

A little before 1 a.m. in the Brookside neighborhood of Kansas City, Mo., an armed man walked into a 7-Eleven with crime on his mind. At that hour, he likely figured odds were on his side—one clerk, no customers and a gun in hand.

What he didn’t figure was that he wouldn’t be the only one with a gun. He found that out the hard way when he pulled his sidearm out and attempted to rob the store. Rather than hand over the cash, the clerk drew his own gun in response. The robber then ran to the door and turned around and pointed his firearm at the clerk. The 7-Eleven employee fired a single shot and the robber fled for good. 

The armed robber remains at large—likely with a gunshot wound, as the clerk believed his bullet struck the suspect.


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