Anti-Gun Backlash Again Boosts Sales

posted on September 7, 2015

In a pattern that is becoming increasingly familiar, the introduction of gun-control legislation and a journalistic backlash against the Second Amendment have brought about increased sales of firearms and ammunition, as consumers worry about what they will be able to buy in the future. According to USA Today, the FBI reported 1.7 million background checks in August—the highest for any August on record since the system began in 1998. 

Dan Gross, president of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, responded to the figures by claiming that during periods of increased sales, “more and more weapons find a set of dangerous hands to call home.” We’ve yet to see any compelling evidence for this—but regardless, what exactly does he think is causing the sales to rise? If anti-gunners want sales to stay low, maybe they should stop supporting new gun-control measures.

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