California’s Concealed-Carry Death Spiral

posted on September 4, 2015

The 2012 case of Lu v. Baca accused the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department of violating state law by forcing citizens to obtain permission from a local police chief before applying for a concealed-carry permit. In January 2014, a Superior Court judge agreed and ordered LACSD to begin accepting and processing license applications.

Fast forward to today, when a new bill is now making the rounds. AB 1134, proposed by Democrat Assemblyman Mark Stone, would allow county sheriffs to establish agreements with local police chiefs to process concealed-carry applications—the very same practice that was ruled illegal in 2014. The bill passed the state Senate on Wednesday.

Gun rights advocates are raising the red flag on this end-around. They contend it would not only circumvent the Lu victory, but would force potential concealed-carry licensees to make their way through an ever-growing sea of red tape.

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