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Guinness World Records Locks Out 1,000 Shooters

Guinness World Records Locks Out 1,000 Shooters

In 2013, 358 people gathered in one spot and danced lewdly together, thereby setting a new Guinness world record for people twerking simultaneously. That’s impressive, indeed, but seems to lose some of its significance when you consider the Guinness Book of World Records also recognizes 12,970 people in the world’s largest Zumba class in 2015.

In truth, people gather in great numbers each year, in locations all over the globe, trying to make the record book. And some of the records are impressive, if not outright weird. Take for instance the largest swimsuit photo shoot (1,010), largest barbeque (30,000 people grilling at one time), largest prenatal yoga class (553 pregnant women), largest pillow fight (6,261 participants), and most naked riders on a theme park ride (102 on a roller coaster). There’s even a world record for hula hooping, where 4,483 people hula hooped for 7 minutes, and a world largest kazoo ensemble, with 3,000 people blowing those infernal noise-makers at the same time.There’s even a world record for hula hooping, where 4,483 people hula hooped for 7 minutes.

What you won’t find, apparently, is a brand-new record for 1,000 Second Amendment supporters firing two shots simultaneously. And the reason why is a mystery, since that record was set at a recent Second Amendment-friendly event.

Last Monday, 1,000 Second Amendment supporters gathered at the Ben Avery Shooting Facility in Phoenix, Ariz., to take their place in the history books. Dubbed the 1000 Man Shoot, attendees sought to set the world record for number of people firing two shots simultaneously by lining up on the range and firing a shot from a special edition .22-caliber Henry Golden Boy Silver rifle, then firing a second shot minutes later.

The event was planned by NRA and Henry Repeating Arms as an expression of support for, and to raise money in defense of, the Second Amendment. And from all accounts, everything went exactly according to plan. Standing shoulder-to-shoulder at the outdoor shooting facility, 1,000 men and women stood ready, aimed and fired. Two minutes later, they fired again, and were answered with a big cheer. The 1,000 shooters present achieved the world record, and the event was documented so there would be no question as to whether the record was reached.

Mysteriously, the folks at Guinness are refusing to recognize the event as a new world record.“To fire for our Second Amendments rights, you can't explain a better feeling,” Melissa Howe, who had traveled to the event all the way from West Virginia, told KPNX.

Mysteriously, the folks at Guinness are refusing to recognize the event as a new world record, whether for political reasons or some other purpose. And according to a report at nraila.org, “The reason for Guinness’ refusal is not clear, as a search of the organization’s records database shows that they recognize a host of firearms-related records.”

Next time you decide to take a look at the sometimes odd world of world records, you’ll likely see the largest gathering of Santa’s elves (607), largest number of people receiving a beauty treatment at the same time (1,000 getting a facial), and the largest gathering of people in their underpants (116). Unfortunately, you won’t find mention of the 1,000 patriots who lined up in Phoenix to set a world record, while at the same time celebrating their Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms.

NRA-ILA has provided contact information for those who would like to politely urge Guinness to recognize this historic achievement. The record-keeping organization can be reached by form email, or by telephone at (718) 513-7270.