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Tuesday, March 8, 2016

Border Anxiety Increases As Border Patrol Shrinks

On Dec. 7 last year, a New Mexico ranch hand was taken hostage by stranded Mexican drug runners who loaded his truck with their drugs and drove to Willcox, Ariz., before releasing him with a warning not to go to the police.

Tricia Elbrock, who employed the ranch hand, said, “This is still pretty raw … They did rough him up, but we got him back. It’s a mess … We have got to have help down here.” 

This and other recent border incidents have sparked a public meeting between cattlemen and public officials in Animas, N.M., this week. Caren Cowan, executive director of the New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association, told the Albuquerque Journal, “The folks down there have never gotten any relief from illegal crossings, and things have ramped up. People are desperate.”

The Journal reports that the Border Patrol’s Lordsburg station is down about 50 agents from its budgeted total of 284.


“El Chapo” Visited U.S. At Least Twice, Daughter Reveals

Speaking of drug runners and the porous border, after his second escape from a Mexican prison—and before he was recaptured in January and sent back to the same prison—the Mexican drug cartel kingpin “El Chapo” Guzmán visited relatives in the United States with the help of corrupt politicians, his eldest daughter told the Guardian. 

Rosa Isela Guzmán Ortiz reportedly claimed El Chapo had visited the U.S. at least twice, and visited her at a southern California five-bedroom house that he had bought for her. El Chapo also has other family in the U.S., including his third wife, a U.S. citizen. According to Guzmán Ortiz, El Chapo bought protection with campaign contributions to senior Mexican politicians. 

If one of the most wanted criminals in the world can escape from prison and waltz across the U.S. border untouched, how many more dangerous criminals, fugitives and terrorists—with God-knows-what as their cargo—are coming across our border every day?


Gun Thefts Increase Again In 2015, According To ATF

A report from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives shows gun thefts from federally licensed dealers grew for the second straight year. More than 6,100 firearms, mostly handguns, were reported stolen—a rise of over 450 from 2014. Burglaries accounted for the greater part of thefts last year, at 4,721. 

Of course, criminals stealing guns to sell to other criminals or use in later crimes is nothing new. In fact, most criminals don’t buy their guns from licensed dealers with a federal background check conducted; rather, they steal them, buy them on the street or get them from family or fellow gang members. That’s one reason so-called “universal” background checks—so widely touted as the answer by anti-gunners—prove fruitless in curtailing violent crime.


Fresh Out Of Jail, Career Criminal Kills Cop In Ambush

A career criminal, whose sister noted that “his favorite thing was to fight,” was arrested in Euless, Texas, last Monday morning for public intoxication. Despite his lengthy rap sheet filled with violent crimes, Jorge Brian Gonzalez was back out on the streets a little more than 24 hours later. High on methamphetamine, Gonzalez was seeking a fight. 

First, he went looking for guns—breaking into a home and stealing a cache of firearms. Then he went looking for victims—uniformed victims. Gonzalez hid in a drainage ditch and fired shots into the air, hoping to ambush responding law enforcement. 

Officer David Hofer was first on the scene, and Gonzalez opened fire—killing Hofer before other officers fatally shot Gonzalez. In two years on the force, Hofer had received eight letters of commendation. But his promising light was extinguished at the hands of a criminal who should’ve still been behind bars.


Navy SEALs: Sharing Service Rifles Is Undermining Our Training Efforts

Imagine you have a rifle outfitted to your specifications, and gear adjusted to your personal needs. You spend a substantial time training before spending several months to a year using it. Then imagine your rifle is given to someone else, and the next time you need one, you’ll have to start from scratch with a completely different gun. 

It’d be bad enough for a hunter or competition shooter, but according to Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., who has spoken with several Navy SEALs on this matter, this is the reality facing many of the nation’s most elite troops. 

Recent budget boosts and the relatively small price of rifles suggests insufficient funding isn’t to blame. Instead, Hunter cites a slow-moving, out-of-touch bureaucracy and wasteful spending. With a current budget of $10.4 billion, plus $400 million more proposed for 2017, there’s no reason our most elite fighters should be at such a disadvantage. 

“It’s their lifeline. So let them keep their guns until they’re assigned desk jobs at the Pentagon,” Hunter argued.


Retired Police Sergeant Fights Back Against Burglars

Two men were shot while attempting to break into the Detroit home of a retired police sergeant. The 70-year-old homeowner was in his living room around 1:35 p.m. last Tuesday when he heard a noise at his back door. The 37-year veteran of the Detroit Police Department confronted the two suspects, struggled with the intruders and fired. 

According to police, one of the suspects was shot in the back, and the homeowner was able to restrain him until the authorities arrived on the scene. The second suspect fled the home after being shot in the stomach and is still at large. The victim was uninjured during the incident, and police are continuing the search for the second suspect.


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