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Friday, May 12, 2017

Railroad Tries To Stop Gun Thefts By Chicago Gangs

It’s a funny thing about criminals—if they’ll break one law, they’ll likely break any law. Those who are doing the killing in Chicago—and who are leading the city to record violence levels—are not law-abiding citizens who have obtained their guns legally. Despite what the city’s Democratic leaders would have you believe, they are criminals doing what criminals do best: breaking laws.

After it was reported that Chicago gangs were targeting gun shipments at a south side Chicago railyard—some 150 guns were stolen between 2014 and 2016—U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., sent Virginia-based Norfolk Southern a letter asking them to increase security. Last week, the railroad reported that a handful of new safety measures were now in effect and should help reduce theft. 

Now if only Sen. Durbin was as interested in Chicago’s lack of prosecution or jail time for offenders.


NRA’s Cox: Trump Keeping Promise On Judicial Nominations

Just a few weeks after President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Neil Gorsuch, won confirmation in the U.S. Senate, the president is moving forward with filling vacancies on lower federal courts. And Chris W. Cox, executive director of NRA’s Institute for Legislative Action, believes that is going quite well.

“As he did in nominating Neil Gorsuch for the Supreme Court, once again President Trump is keeping his promise to the American people by nominating constitutional originalists across the federal courts,” Cox told the Washington Free Beacon.

Such nominations are incredibly important to the future of freedom in our country. There are some 127 vacancies on various federal courts, which gives Trump an opportunity to offset some of the 331 liberal judges Barack Obama appointed to the federal courts during his tenure as president.


Indiana Supreme Court Rules Against Stopping Gun Carriers For No Reason

The Indiana Supreme Court on Monday ruled that police officers can’t detain and question a person based only on a report that the individual has a gun—a win for those who lawfully carry concealed firearms in the Hoosier State.

According to a report at wibc.com, the state high court sided with an earlier decision by the Indiana Court of Appeals, which ruled that officers violated the Fourth Amendment's protection against unreasonable searches and seizures when they detained and questioned Thomas Pinner after a taxi driver called 911 to report that Pinner had dropped a handgun when exiting a cab at a movie theater.

“The United States Supreme Court has previously declared that law enforcement may not arbitrarily detain an individual to ensure compliance with licensing and registration laws without particularized facts supporting an inference of illegal conduct,” stated the Supreme Court opinion. “In like fashion, we decline to endorse such behavior to ensure compliance with Indiana’s gun licensing laws.”

Ohio Concealed Firearm Advocate Shoots Boyfriend In Self-Defense

On the way to Sears to buy biodegradable toilet paper, everything went to pot for Jordana Esses.

On Monday, Esses was heading to the Dayton Mall with her on-again/off-again boyfriend Brenton Boudreau when a disagreement turned contentious—then physical. Police tell Dayton Daily News that Esses was forced to grab her pistol and fire at Bourdreau, hitting him twice in the leg. Boudreau, who left the hospital against doctor’s orders after treatment, may face assault and felony kidnapping charges.

Esses recently appeared on television in South Carolina as a concealed-carry advocate, speaking to the importance of CCW classes. "Each state has individual laws, so you have to know those laws, and you have to know them to protect yourself and others," she said. "Owning a gun (is) not a decision to be taken lightly, because if you have a gun you have to be able to use it if need be."


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