A Train Robber's Revolver

posted on October 4, 2016
legends-in-arms_black-jack-ketchum.jpg
Michael Ives

This notorious outlaw was born in Texas and grew up a cowboy. He later turned to a life of crime and moved to New Mexico in his 30s. There, he continued to run afoul of the law and was involved in numerous train robberies and murders.

By the late 1800s, he had joined the infamous Hole in the Wall Gang. His well-known nickname came about as a case of mistaken identity—another outlaw mistook him for someone else—but the moniker stuck and he became known by this nickname as well.

In 1899, attempting a single-handed train robbery, he was shot and wounded by the conductor. He later faced trial and was convicted of “felonious assault upon a railway train”—the punishment of which was death. After his hanging in Union County, N.M., the law was later changed.

Learn more about this bandit and this Colt revolver that he brandished here. His story is just one of many that are told daily at the the NRA National Firearms Museum in Fairfax, Va.

Latest

Charles L. Cotton
Charles L. Cotton

President’s Column | Ukraine’s Example

For anyone who ever needed proof of how crucial gun rights are to our survival and our safety, I have just two words of advice: Remember Ukraine!

Freedom’s Biggest Movement: Constitutional Carry

I am immensely proud to join with Second Amendment supporters across America in celebrating a major milestone reached in April, when Georgia became the 25th constitutional-carry state.

Standing Guard | 151 Years Strong!

With the NRA now over 150 years old, it's no overstatement to say that the vision, initiative and determination shared by you, me and millions of our fellow members have fueled the greatest restoration of freedom this nation has ever seen.

President Donald J. Trump to Address NRA Members at the 2022 NRA Annual Meetings and Exhibits

The former president will headline a star-studded cast of political heavyweights at the NRA Annual Meetings in Houston, Texas.

Court Rules That 18-21 Year Olds Also Have Constitutional Rights

Here's what a recent ruling from the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals means for 18-21-year-olds' constitutional rights.

Gun Owners Spent $15 Billion on What?

Firearms and ammunitions purchases go a long way towards conservation efforts and so much more.



Get the best of America's 1st Freedom delivered to your inbox.