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Third Century | Tyler Schropp

Third Century | Tyler Schropp

Tyler Schropp was born in Nebraska, where he grew up loving sports. In high school, he kicked a 49-yard field goal and was a Gatorade All-American soccer player. In college, he played four years for the Georgetown University soccer team. He’s passionate about the challenge of sporting clays, is an avid dove and pheasant hunter, and has taken lechwe on the plains of Africa. Today, when he’s not running half marathons or playing golf with his three young children, Schropp makes time to enjoy another great American sport—shooting.

As executive director of the NRA Office of Advancement, Schropp’s aim is now squarely set on preserving the future of the NRA and the right of every lawful American to enjoy their Second Amendment freedom—in this century and beyond. To do that, he’s leading one of the most sophisticated fundraising operations in the country.

Every time I go to the range, I’m amazed. It seems everybody is getting into shooting. I see men and women of all races, young professionals like me—good, decent people who are raising families, contributing to their communities and discovering for themselves the great sport of shooting.

As executive director of the NRA Office of Advancement, my job is pretty simple: Raise money … enough to fund NRA safety training and education programs into the next century … enough to help fund political efforts this year, next year and for decades after that … enough to ensure that the NRA remains the strongest, most ardent defender of the Second Amendment and the constitutional freedoms that make America the best nation on Earth.

Our dedicated staff and I are all about making sure millions and millions of good Americans who shoot keep their right to lawfully exercise their Second Amendment freedom. With the help of committed members of the NRA Board of Directors, we are building the most advanced and effective major donor programs in history. I am truly humbled by the generous support of so many. The NRA would not be what it is today without the continued commitment of our members and benefactors.

All across this country, Americans who have been blessed with success have signed on to our efforts to secure the future of so many critical NRA programs. They are making significant donations to support the Freedom Action Foundation, our nonpartisan voter registration program; NRA Life of Duty, which serves the men and women who go to work every day to protect and defend the American people; programs to prevent child accidents; and enhanced training and shooting programs for women. “Our dedicated staff and I are all about making sure millions and millions of good Americans who shoot keep their right to lawfully exercise their Second Amendment freedom.”

In fact, the NRA Women’s Leadership Forum has become one of our most popular efforts. More women own more firearms—and shoot more—than ever before. The Women’s Leadership Forum provides an avenue for philanthropic women to play a vital role in the future of the NRA and the shooting sports.

One of the most popular ways for people to contribute to the NRA is through estate planning. Charitable giving is important to many people as they plan for the future beyond their own years. It’s an easy, yet important, way for anyone—no matter how limited or vast their resources—to stipulate a contribution to the NRA and leave a legacy to an organization they love.

It has been exciting to see so many people, from all walks of life, joining the NRA, supporting our efforts and getting into shooting. I became involved years ago while traveling the world with the late Charlton Heston. I can still hear his baritone voice advising young people: “Do your best. Keep your promises.”

That’s what we’re doing at the National Rifle Association—we’re doing our best to build the resources to preserve American freedom in this century and the next, so the NRA can keep its promise to Americans to always defend that great freedom.