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Friday, June 2, 2017

Burglar With Taser Shot By Armed Homeowner

Paper beats rock. Rock beats scissors. Gun beats Taser. That’s the universal logic a home invader in Arizona learned the hard way.

The Mohave County Sheriff’s Office tells ABC-15 that just after 7 p.m. last Saturday, a burglar entered a Kingman residence armed with a Taser. Police say the suspect used the Taser on the homeowner multiple times as he rifled through the house.

However, the homeowner was able to grab his firearm and shoot the robber, who died from his injuries a short time later. Arizona’s Castle Doctrine law gives citizens the right to use deadly force against an intruder, and investigators say this shooting clearly falls under that legislation.


Why Is Shannon Watts So Confused About Suppressors?

If Shannon Watts, Michael Bloomberg’s head Demanding Mom, sounds confused, it’s not our fault.

As frequent A1F Daily contributor AWR Hawkins pointed out at Breitbart.com on Wednesday, Watts is claiming that those using the word “suppressor” when supporting the Hearing Protection Act are actually trying to confuse her and others who don’t want the devices deregulated.

“It’s all semantics. Focusing on the name distracts people from the real conversation,” Watts told thehill.com. “They did the same thing with the debate over whether to use the term ‘assault rifles’ or ‘semi-automatic rifles,’ and then the whole conversation shifted to ‘What are we going to call these things?’ They want to get into semantics about the language, so we don’t talk about how dangerous they are.”

In fact, suppressors actually do suppress the sound a gun makes when firing, but they don’t make it “silent” by a long shot. What’s so confusing about that?


Permitless Carry On The Move In North Carolina

With the introduction of House Bill 746, North Carolina has joined the list of states with permitless carry bills up for consideration this legislative session.

The measure, which would bring the state’s concealed-carry regulations in line with its open-carry rules, would also lower the minimum age for concealed-carry permit holders from 21 to 18, and would expand the list of places where firearms may be legally carried. Under current state law, individuals not otherwise legally prohibited may openly carry a firearm without a permit, but a permit is required for anyone wishing to carry a gun in a briefcase or purse, or under a coat.

The House Judiciary Committee approved HB 746 Wednesday, and the measure now heads to the House Finance Committee. Due to legislative deadlines, the bill requires the addition of a monetary component in order to progress further this session. But with Republican majorities in both the House and the Senate, the measure still has a good chance of passage.


Utah Looks To Raise Carry Permit Fees

On the heels of Texas drastically reducing the price of its concealed-carry permit fees, the state of Utah appears to be attempting to go in just the opposite direction.

NRA’s Institute for Legislative Action reports that the Utah Bureau of Criminal Identification is planning to increase the cost of a Utah Concealed Firearm Permit by more than 50 percent. Additionally, BCM is also wanting to raise the fee to process fingerprint cards for applicants, making acquiring a carry permit even more costly.

As author and researcher John Lott pointed out in a recent op-ed concerning a Connecticut proposal to hike fees, high permit fees make it harder for those with lower income to practice their Second Amendment rights. “Democrats want votes from poor minorities, but they aren't really looking out for them, certainly not when it comes to their right to self-defense,” Lott wrote. “The result of the hefty fees is that only well-off people will be able to defend themselves and their families.”


More Gun Training For Colorado Teachers

Coloradans for Civil Liberties (CCL) has partnered with the Independence Institute to bring firearms training to state teachers. Laura Carno, the co-founder of CCL, told the Colorado Springs Gazette that there is growing interest in the advanced training course that CCL will be providing.

"People want a fighting chance," said Carno, who was instrumental in the 2013 recall of anti-gun State Senate President John Morse. "One person is killed every 17 seconds in mass shootings. Even if you have a school resource officer in one hallway, if this happens in another hallway, how many 17 seconds is OK?"

CCL’s training is based off of Ohio’s FASTER (Faculty/Administrator Safety Training and Emergency Response) program, which has benefited some 900 teachers thus far. Colorado’s first three-day course will be held June 20-22 at a shooting range in northern Weld County.

Two dozen Colorado school districts currently have staff members that carry concealed firearms and are designated as school security officers.


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