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Thursday, September 14, 2017

Rural Homeowner In Idaho Shoots Invader

If you live in rural Idaho and police are miles away, you need to be prepared to protect life and property. And one homeowner was at the ready when trouble came calling.

Police say that around 4:30 a.m. last Friday, a man tried to force his way into a Bannock County residence, leaving the homeowner no choice but to open fire. The intruder, later identified as Joseph Lloyd, died at the scene before officers arrived.

Ashley Bastain told KPVI-TV that she’s appreciative that her neighbor defended his family and their rustic community. “It’s Idaho, it’s in the country, everyone’s going to protect their own, and so pretty much everyone's packing around here. So you've got to be careful.”

Carry Permits For Black Women Jump In Chicago

It’s no secret that violent crime in Chicago has been spiraling out of control. So it should come as no surprise that citizens are taking self-protection into their own hands. One group in particular has been motivated to action: black women.

The Chicago Tribune reports that nearly 1,368 black women have received a concealed-carry permit in 2017 to date. That figure exceeds the 2016 total of 1,358 for the entire year. While black women still trail other groups, they are trending upward.

Vernetta Robinzine is just one example. She lives in the city’s Far South Side and has already had her house broken into once. “I just didn’t want to feel like a victim, or vulnerable,” she told the Tribune.

Poll Shows That Guns Rights Are Important To Voters

A Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll of 1,200 voters asked which issues they considered important enough to have an effect on how they voted in an election, intentionally leaving out a few nearly universal concerns like foreign policy and the economy. The greatest number of respondents picked “gun rights or gun control” as the issue most important to them.

Some 35 percent of respondents listed guns as their top issue, beating out other hot-button topics like immigration and abortion. As NRA-ILA explains, the poll did not distinguish in this question between pro- and anti-gun positions, yet in another question asking whether the government did too much or too little to restrict access to firearms, the greater number of respondents said there was already too much regulation.

In total, 48 percent of respondents also responded affirmatively to the question, “Do you, or does anyone in your household, own a gun of any kind?” This number is higher than what appeared in past versions of the same poll. Good news, then: Evidence indicates that the American voting populace is not only embracing guns in greater numbers, but many of them are also fiercely committed to defending the Second Amendment.

Texas Governor Orders Free Carry Permit Replacement After Hurricane

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott is trying to help state concealed-carry permit holders who might have lost their permit, or had it ruined, in the flooding and aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

On Tuesday, Abbott directed the Texas Department of Public Safety to provide no-cost replacements of License to Carry a Handgun cards and Private Security Board licensee cards for eligible residents who have had their cards lost or damaged as a result of Harvey. 

“As Texas begins the recovery process, we are prepared to respond to a wide range of issues to help victims of this Hurricane,” Abbott said. “By eliminating burdensome fees to replace these important licenses, Texans can focus on rebuilding their lives and communities.”

Residents living in counties that have received a gubernatorial disaster declaration and who are currently active Texas LTC or PSB license holders must call the Regulatory Services Division contact center at (512) 424-7293 for assistance in waiving the fee.


California Science Teacher Wins Battle Over Zero-Tolerance Nonsense

A three-year-long case of zero tolerance run amok came to a close recently when an arbitration panel sided with an instructor accused of helping his students make guns.

In 2014, Greg Schiller, who teaches biology in Los Angeles, had volunteered to help students prepare science fair projects. But when one project—a tube that could propel objects using air pressure—arrived with the title “Can You Make A Gun Out Of PVC?” on the day of the fair, it was reported and confiscated, along with another project, which ejected objects with an electromagnetic coil, a disposable camera capacitor and a AA battery. Neither of these common science-fair projects employed gunpowder and—despite ludicrous and baseless claims from the district—neither was capable of harming anyone.

Still, Schiller was suspended based on the district’s “zero tolerance” weapons policy. During that time, his fencing team was forced to forfeit its season, and his students were reportedly subjected to a series of less-than-competent substitutes. After two months, the District caved to pressure from parents, the media and students to let Schiller return, docking him three days’ pay and placing a note in his permanent record.

Schiller, who knew he’d done nothing wrong, challenged the penalty and was finally vindicated when the three-person arbitration panel ruled, “While the device created by these two students would meet the strict definition of a weapon as defined by the zero-tolerance policy … strict application without thought can potentially stifle or impede learning.”

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